Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Matters Of Interest Concerning The Alamo Itself.

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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:28 pm

Someone else's "reimagining", San Antonio Express News, Friday, July 20, 2017
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Fri Jul 21, 2017 2:44 am

Limestone posts 8-10 foot high going all the way through the buildings on the west side of the plaza and through the old post office building too?
It sounds a bit weird. I think.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Fri Jul 21, 2017 5:17 pm

Seguin wrote:Limestone posts 8-10 foot high going all the way through the buildings on the west side of the plaza and through the old post office building too?
It sounds a bit weird. I think.


I can see it. Just disregard the glass and look at the posts.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Sat Jul 22, 2017 1:16 am

NefariousNed wrote:
Seguin wrote:Limestone posts 8-10 foot high going all the way through the buildings on the west side of the plaza and through the old post office building too?
It sounds a bit weird. I think.


I can see it. Just disregard the glass and look at the posts.


Right, but how to you get such tall posts to run through the west side buildings and through the old post office?
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Sat Jul 22, 2017 1:22 am

Looks like "The Alamo Meets Stonehenge". :?
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Sat Jul 22, 2017 6:35 pm

There SHOULD be posts at the north end of the compound because that's where the POST OFFICE is! :lol:
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:31 pm

Seguin wrote:
NefariousNed wrote:
Seguin wrote:Limestone posts 8-10 foot high going all the way through the buildings on the west side of the plaza and through the old post office building too?
It sounds a bit weird. I think.


I can see it. Just disregard the glass and look at the posts.


Right, but how to you get such tall posts to run through the west side buildings and through the old post office?

Wouldn't really need to. Any plan is subject to reevaluation and change. Just retain the feasible parts of it.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:33 pm

Current status of the Alamo Master Plan from the cover of today's San Antonio Express News
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:14 pm

NefariousNed wrote:Current status of the Alamo Master Plan from the cover of today's San Antonio Express News


I appreciate the HUGO & SCHMELTZER building plan more and more each time I see the GLO master plan for the Alamo. :roll:
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Sat Aug 19, 2017 8:49 am

Current status of the Alamo Master Plan from the cover of today's San Antonio Express News


At least the glass walls are no longer part of the project.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:55 pm

:?: How much time is left for the GLO to create its "World Class Museum" for them to receive the Phil Collins collection? I thought he gave them 5 years. It seems like 2 or 3 years have already gone by.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:21 pm

SantaClaus wrote::?: How much time is left for the GLO to create its "World Class Museum" for them to receive the Phil Collins collection? I thought he gave them 5 years. It seems like 2 or 3 years have already gone by.

In 2014, he gave them 7 years to build the museum, so the deadline is 2021.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:03 pm

NefariousNed wrote:
SantaClaus wrote::?: How much time is left for the GLO to create its "World Class Museum" for them to receive the Phil Collins collection? I thought he gave them 5 years. It seems like 2 or 3 years have already gone by.

In 2014, he gave them 7 years to build the museum, so the deadline is 2021.

I guess that's doable. Groundbreaking for the Bob Bullock Museum of Texas History in Austin was in 1999, and they opened in 2001. That doesn't take into account all the preliminary paperwork/permitting/funding before the Bullock groundbreaking, but maybe the Alamo museum won't need as much time since they're trying to use already existing structures. Then again, adapting existing structures might take longer than starting from scratch. 2021 will be upon us in no time at all.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby RLC-GTT on Mon Aug 21, 2017 3:51 am

Well, my guess is that the deadline won't be of importance once the museum is being created physically along with a schedule for however long it will take. As long as he knows it is being accomplished. But I too think it is doable in that time frame.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Mon Aug 21, 2017 1:45 pm

RLC-GTT wrote:Well, my guess is that the deadline won't be of importance once the museum is being created physically along with a schedule for however long it will take. As long as he knows it is being accomplished. But I too think it is doable in that time frame.


Right! I can´t imagine him looking at a half finished museum in 2021 saying he wants his collection back. Hopefully, it will be completed by 2021.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Fri Aug 25, 2017 10:26 pm

From the Texas General land Office:

August 25, 2017

A Plan to Save The Alamo

For more than 200 years the Alamo has been called the Alamo and it always will be the Alamo.

Preserving the Alamo is our number one priority. The Alamo Church and Long Barrack need significant preservation to ensure they
will remain standing in another 300 years.

We must recapture the 1836 Battlefield/courtyard. Today a busy street runs through the 1836 Battlefield where Defenders fought
and died. We must remove the street, free-speech zone, and the current “carnival-like” atmosphere to create a place of reverence,
dignity, and respect for those who died fighting for Texas’ Independence.

You may have heard some rumors about the Alamo. Here are the most common misconceptions.

The Alamo will always be called “the Alamo.”
Are you renaming the Alamo?


No. Not now, not ever. It will always be called the Alamo. No recommendation or proposal has ever been made to change the name.
We have grown our Living History program to more than a dozen staff and volunteers — 1836 lives each and every day at the Alamo.

Do the recent plans to recapture the Battlefield and 1836 footprint attempt to change history?

Absolutely not. The 1836 Battle is central to future plans. It is the event that defines the Alamo’s role in history. It is, by far, the
largest exhibit in the new museum and will always be the central story. The plan will tell the 1836 story through compelling exhibits
and living history programs, and in the Alamo. The proposed plan is to reclaim as much of the Battlefield footprint as possible so
visitors can better understand what the Battle was like inside the walls.

What is happening to the Alamo walls and the historic 1836 footprint?

The main goals of the Alamo master plan are to preserve and protect the Alamo Church and Long Barrack and recapture the 1836
Battlefield. Alamo staff and museum interpretation and exhibit specialists will make recommendations on options for a perimeter
that honors the Alamo’s history and ensures the safety of the Alamo and her visitors.

But I heard the Alamo would be surrounded by glass!

No. The structural glass walls were one of many early concepts proposed. No wall design has been approved, and no wall that
doesn’t honor the 1836 Alamo Battlefield will be approved. Most visitors have no idea that they’re driving on the 1836 Battlefield
when they drive in front of the Alamo. We are working to recapture this sacred Battlefield and restore it to more closely resemble
what it looked like in 1836.

Will the Reimagine plan turn the Alamo into a theme park?

No! It will become MORE respectful and dignified. The current “carnival-like” and “commercial” atmosphere in front of the Alamo
will become a place of reverence, dignity, and respect to commemorate the Battle of 1836 and those who died fighting for Texas’
Independence. To make this possible, the General Land Office purchased the buildings across the street from the Alamo, and the
plan calls for closing the streets so the 1836 Battlefield can be recaptured and used for Living History exhibits and to allow visitors
to Remember the Alamo.

Cenotaph means “empty tomb.”
What are you going to do with the Cenotaph?


The City of San Antonio owns the Cenotaph and plans to repair this monument to the Defenders. Cenotaph means “empty tomb.”
There are no ashes or remains of the Defenders in it, and it does not mark the place where their bodies were burned after the Battle.
None of the three funeral pyres were located inside the walls of the Alamo. Evidence indicates that two of the fires were near St.
Joseph Church on Commerce Street. The third was some distance behind the Alamo’s church. The Cenotaph will always stand, but the
City of San Antonio has made no final decision on the Cenotaph’s future location. The Cenotaph might be moved to where the Defenders’
bodies were burned, to honor that place which is currently unmarked.

Where did the state and national flags, battle artifacts, plaques go?

They are where they have been for decades. Some items were temporarily moved to allow historic preservation work to be done on the
walls. As work is completed, the items have been returned. The museum will finally be home for the spectacular Phil Collins collection
as well as the Alamo’s own collection.

Will battle artifacts be confined to a basement?

No. The Master Plan proposes a 100,000+ square foot museum that will be home to hundreds of Alamo artifacts including the spectacular
Phil Collins collection featuring David Crockett’s rifle and James Bowie’s knife. It will also include a theatre featuring a film about this
beloved Texas site, the 13 Day Siege, and the Battle of 1836. The Battle of the Alamo is and will always be the heart of the story, as
that moment defines the Alamo and Texas itself.
We must put preserving the Alamo ahead of everything else.

Aren’t you creating a “free speech zone” to restrict where citizens can exercise their First Amendment rights?

No. The plan removes the current “free speech zone” from Alamo Plaza — in the heart of the 1836 Battlefield — to an area outside of where
the walls once stood, further restoring dignity and reverence to this sacred ground.

Does the United Nations have any role in the management of the Alamo?

No! Not now, not ever. The Alamo, along with four other Spanish-era missions in San Antonio, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage
site in 2015. This is nothing more than a designation and has nothing to do with management of the Alamo.

The Alamo Church and Long Barrack are 300 years old and in desperate need of structural repair.
What are you doing about the Alamo and the Long Barrack?


This year we will begin the process to preserve and protect the Church and Long Barrack so that future generations can learn about the
history of the Alamo, the 1836 Battle, and the history of Texas independence. The Alamo Church and Long Barrack are in desperate need
of structural repair. More than 300 years of heat, rain, and elements have taken a toll.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:52 am

Hopefully, that article will put to rest some of the rumors we see in the various Alamo pages on Facebook and elsewhere. I remember seeing one
about the Alamo name would be changed to Mission San Antonio de Valero and the one about the UN controlling the Alamo comes up with regular
intervals.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby K Hale on Sat Aug 26, 2017 4:37 pm

Seguin wrote:Hopefully, that article will put to rest some of the rumors we see in the various Alamo pages on Facebook and elsewhere. I remember seeing one
about the Alamo name would be changed to Mission San Antonio de Valero and the one about the UN controlling the Alamo comes up with regular
intervals.

People like to panic themselves.
Verum non in verbus, sed in testimonium.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby RLC-GTT on Sat Aug 26, 2017 7:13 pm

Plus, most believe what they read -- and then expand upon the details they feel are offensive. I have learned to pay little attention to reactionaries.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Sun Aug 27, 2017 3:54 am

People like to panic themselves.


That´s for sure, and often without good reason.

Plus, most believe what they read -- and then expand upon the details they feel are offensive. I have learned to pay little attention to reactionaries.


And then a feather soon become five hens (to quote a fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen). - Reactionaries are always upset about something, it seems.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby warren on Mon Aug 28, 2017 3:33 pm

For every reactionary, there is an equal and opposite re-reactionary.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby RLC-GTT on Mon Aug 28, 2017 6:39 pm

And the snowball grows and grows and grows..........
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:30 am

From Lee Spencer White, Alamo Descendants Association :

September 1, 2017

To my fellow Texans and all who love the Alamo,

I'm Lee Spencer White, Founder and President of the Alamo Defenders Descendants
Association (ADDA), Direct Bloodline of the Alamo garrison. We represent the men,
women, and children who were inside the Alamo during the 1836 battle. Our ancestors
were Esparza, Crockett, Jennings, and Abamillo.

We are strongly opposed to the current REIMAGINE THE ALAMO Master Plan which
has been forced upon us by Texas General Land Office Commissioner George P. Bush.
There are many detrimental aspects of the plan, but the most egregious of these is that it
diminishes—even disrespects—the ultimate sacrifice of the Alamo Defenders. Master
Planner George Skarmeas has stated, “We cannot single out one moment in time.” While
the ADDA respect the many layers of history of the Alamo, we feel the 1836 battle is its
defining moment and why it is remembered or even exists today.

For over twenty years our organization has gathered for a soul-stirring candlelight service
inside the Alamo Chapel. A service where the Alamo roll call is read and the descendant
of that person stands to honor their Alamo ancestor. We the blood of those brave men and
women have been denied the use of the Chapel since George P. Bush took control, having
been shuffled to a side building outside the battlefield or even worse into the street.

The REIMAGINE Plan encouraged the City of San Antonio to pass a motion to remove
the Cenotaph, the 1936 monument to the ultimate sacrifice of the Alamo Defenders
whose names are engraved thereon, completely out of Alamo Plaza. Yes, locating it
several blocks away where it will fall prey to vandals. This is how we honor and
remember the Alamo? The City of San Antonio was told the new site is more appropriate
for the monument as it is the site where the bodies were burned. In fact, that is a lie. We
the Alamo Descendants want to place a bronze marker next to the Cenotaph with an
updated list of Alamo defenders as well as the couriers, survivors, and noncombatants of
the Alamo. PLEASE HELP US. Stop the removal of the monument; get the word out to
everybody: “LEAVE THE CENOTAPH ALONE”—repair, yes—move, no.

I encourage everyone who cares about the Alamo to oppose the REIMAGINE Plan, and
inform every Texan about what is truly happening at the Alamo. Remember the Alamo
not Reimagine it.

God Bless Texas,
Lee Spencer White
President of the Alamo Defenders Descendants Association
1200 Big Bend
Fredericksburg, Texas 78624
361-701-0609
Email: alamo.lee@yahoo.com
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:54 pm

http://therivardreport.us5.list-manage. ... 91dc39eb2d

Short List Emerges for Alamo Plaza Interpretive Design
Iris Dimmick for The Rivard Report 15 hours ago


A $450 million renovation and preservation project is slated for the Alamo, surrounding plaza, and some buildings.
Updated 15 hours ago

Alamo Master Plan officials this week met with four teams that have made it onto the short list of applicants vying to win
the coveted contract for the Alamo Interpretive Design Plan.

“All of them have worked on projects that everybody’s heard of,” Councilman Roberto Treviño (D1) told the Rivard Report
Wednesday. The identity of the firms are confidential while the review process continues. “All of them feel that [the Alamo]
can become the world class project.”

The previous City Council approved the framework for the interpretive design when it voted unanimously in favor of the
conceptual Master Plan in May. The historic project’s Management Committee, comprised of City, State, and Alamo
Endowment representatives, hired renowned consulting firm Preservation Design Partnership (PDP) to lead the master plan
team. The Management Committee, of which Treviño is a member, will also select the Interpretive Design team. That
decision could be made around November.

“We don’t want to rush through this selection process,” he said. The Committee may visit previous “World Heritage-level”
projects that the teams have completed all over the world.

The master plan calls for restoration of the church and long barracks, partial closure of South Alamo and Crockett streets,
relocation and restoration of the 1930s Alamo Cenotaph, a 135,000-sq. ft. interactive museum, and more. The project will
cost an estimated $450 million, funded largely by private donors through the Alamo Endowment, with contributions from the
City, County, and State.

Philadelphia-based PDP is not a part of any of the four teams, Treviño said. It is unclear which role the firm or its Design
Director George Skarmeas will play in the future, “but as the master planner, he’ll always have some kind of connection to
that project.”

The design renderings that materialized in the master planning process elicited harsh criticism, especially for their proposed
tree-less plaza and glass walls which many said would inhibit public access to the Alamo cathedral and its plaza. Skarmeas
became the face of those proposals and received much of the criticism during public input meetings.

Treviño acknowledged that releasing such detailed renderings was “not typical.” There is no call for glass walls in the final
documents, he said, rather a request for an “interpretation” of the historic walls that once lined the plaza. Those renderings
represented an option, but it will be up to the Interpretive Design team to explore those options and formulate a proposal.

Judging by Mayor Ron Nirenberg and Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff’s adamant rejection of glass walls lining the entire
plaza, that is an unlikely option.

One of the most challenging tasks the Interpretive Design team will face is guiding the public through its thought process,
Treviño said, and explain why certain design elements are or are not needed.

“As downtown advocates, Centro supports both the comprehensive Alamo narrative and the enhancement of Alamo Plaza by
encouraging the strengthening of the surrounding urban environment and downtown as a whole,” Centro San Antonio CEO Pat
DiGiovanni stated in an email. “This means an active, inclusive experience led by continued community input.”

Once a team is selected, it will partake in a series of public meetings, he added.

PDP worked with architects and firms from San Antonio, but some residents bristled at the fact that a non-local firm spear-
headed the project.

“We just want to pick the best of the best and it shouldn’t matter where they come from,” Treviño said. The reality is that
“the best” firm for the job may not be from San Antonio, but some applicants have local firms on their team.

The six-member Management Committee – comprised of two representatives each from the City, County, and Endowment –
will work to ensure the planning process’ outcomes were created through “scholarship and not politics,” Treviño said, adding
that the committee often finds itself “in debates, but we are all in agreement that we have to make this work.”

The 1836 Battle of the Alamo is just one of perhaps millions of stories about the historic site, but that one has been told for
decades. The site has more than 10,000 years of history to explore: from indigenous peoples who lived and died there, to
locals and visitors who stop by today.

“This will be a living, breathing exhibit project,” Treviño said. “It will continually grow and try to tell every story as factually
and as thoughtfully as possible.”

The Alamo’s new CEO Douglas McDonald, an award-winning museum consultant, helped the Committee narrow down respondents
to the request for proposals, Treviño said.

The vote earlier this year moved several elements of the plan forward, but City Council still has control over the street closures.
If Council rejects the final design, it still has the option to disallow street closures and land conveyance. Final designs of the plaza
will need approval from the two members of the Master Plan Executive Committee, which includes Mayor Nirenberg and Land
Commissioner George P. Bush. The Texas General Land Office (GLO) manages the Alamo and its plaza.

The City won’t give up ownership of the streets that run through and around the plaza until the design satisfies the community
and stakeholders, Nirenberg told the Rivard Report last month. “If we’re addressing all the concerns … on all sides of this then
conveyance is a step in the process, not a leverage point,” he said.

The Alamo Plaza Master Plan Governance Committee is made up of Treviño, City Manager Sheryl Sculley, Alamo Endowment Chair
Gene Powell, Alamo Endowment board member Ramona Bass, Deputy Land Commissioner Anne Idsal, and GLO Special Council
Hector Valle.

About Iris Dimmick

Iris Dimmick is managing editor of the Rivard Report. She covers City Hall, politics, development, and more.

Contact her at iris@rivardreport.com
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Fri Sep 22, 2017 5:07 am

It looks like Skarmeas is more or less "out".

“We don’t want to rush through this selection process,” he said. The Committee may visit previous “World Heritage-level” projects that the teams have completed all over the world.


Sounds like a great world tour. :D
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby warren on Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:03 pm

Indeed! A first-class junket to the Pyramids would be very enlightening in terms of preserving the Alamo for the next couple of thousand years.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Sun Sep 24, 2017 3:35 am

warren wrote:Indeed! A first-class junket to the Pyramids would be very enlightening in terms of preserving the Alamo for the next couple of thousand years.


Right, and with a side trip to China studying the Chinese wall hoping to get ideas for recreating the Alamo walls. I´m sure the tax payers don´t mind spending money on such first class world tours (cough-cough).
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Thu Sep 28, 2017 12:13 am

Someone must've been reading my post in the "Dreams And Nightmares" thread
where I was recalling a dream I had as a pre-teenager about visiting the Alamo
and seeing it covered by an airtight dome with airlocks!


viewtopic.php?f=12&t=1489&p=111749&hilit=dreams+dome#p111749



Commentary
We Have an Alamodome, Why Not a Domed Alamo?
Richard Weitzel for The Rivard Report September 26, 2017

There has been lots of discussion to date about redeveloping the site of the Alamo. This is my personal input,
and not the views of The Sons of the Republic of Texas (SRT), of which I am the immediate past president of
the Alamo Chapter. The SRT is rightly adamant about members not speaking for the SRT, but the SRT encour-
ages individuals to make their opinions known.

I suggest that the Long Barrack should be rebuilt. My thought is to rebuild the walls and the Long Barrack using
tinted material that closely resembles or matches the existing material. The only difference, I recommend,
would be a slight tint (rust red, for example) to distinguish between the old and the new. Then, the visitor
would know what has been rebuilt versus the “old” construction. Do away with the glass walls altogether.

I believe a very important piece to rebuild is the lunette on the south side of the Alamo. This distinctive
structure would greatly enhance the feeling of the original Alamo grounds.


The Cenotaph is another lightning rod; I say leave it where it is unless there’s some historical reason to move it.
The proposed new location has not even been 100% verified as one of the two “pyre” sites. Some say yes, others
say no. Further, it’s going to cost a bundle to move it, so don’t move it unless there’s a compelling reason to do
so.

Move the gift shop to wherever the visitor center ends up. When you leave SeaWorld, you still have to get the
grandkids past the gift shop. When you leave Fiesta Texas, you still have to get the grandkids past the gift shop.
If we’re going to wall off the Alamo and charge admission, why not have the gift shop as you’re leaving, wherever
the exit turns out to be. The gift shop doesn’t need to be right next to the church, where it currently is.

And I’ve submitted this numerous times: We have an Alamodome in San Antonio, so why not have a domed Alamo?
We know the walls of the church and other parts are crumbling, so why not protect them from the weather and
elements? They will still need to be worked on, given new supports, and whatever else needs to be done, but if we
have a dome, they’ll be protected from future deterioration. The first phase could be kind of open air, like Bob
Hope’s house in Palm Springs. And plan for subsequent phases, like a fully enclosed, air-conditioned dome. Maybe
even start with something like Fremont Street, in Las Vegas, where the streets and walkways are totally covered.
But we have to maintain reverence at the Alamo.

We could have solar panels on top to help pay the electric bill; misters to cool off the customers, using rainwater
collected and stored; and small amphitheaters at historically significant areas of the Alamo, such as where Travis
fell, where Crockett fell, the Immortal 32, the Trevino House, the 13 days of the seige, and others. Last time I
checked, it’s hot in San Antonio in the summer, which is, I believe, when most of the tourists show up at the Alamo.

And the inside ceiling of the dome could be used for laser light shows, holography, projection to show the 13 days
of siege and cannon fire that started on Feb. 23, 1836, and any other depiction that is conducive to using the inside
dome. All of this needs to maintain the integrity of reverence and not turn it into a circus-like atmosphere.

Mark Lemon’s The Illustrated Alamo 1836, which reflects hours of painstaking research and collection of data,
presents the most accurate look and feel of the Alamo that I’ve ever seen. The Alamo Master Plan consultants,
Preservation Design Partnership, didn’t even refer to Lemon’s book, I’m told, although I haven’t verified that.
The book is available on Amazon, and my wife bought one for me for my birthday last year. It’s really good, in my
opinion.


Lemon had his model of the Alamo at The History Shop, which has since closed, just across from the Alamo. This
model, which seemed to be accurate, was described and narrated by musician and Alamo history buff Phil Collins.
It was a worthy historical experience.

As for the three buildings that the General Land Office purchased, they might be historical, but they’re not aesthetic-
ally pleasing. But they might be worth saving, so my thought is that rather than spend an estimated $90 million to
$110 million to do something with them, use a fraction of that to relocate the front walls backward about 30 feet to
clear room for the restored Alamo wall to be rebuilt. Then use the three buildings as the entry to the Alamo and use
the Fremont Street-like covering over the entire entry area. If you walk to the southwest corner, where the 18-pounder
was, you can easily tell where the wall should extend towards the Hotel Gibbs and the Hipolito F. Garcia Federal Building.
That will determine how far back to move the store fronts.
Two battle re-enactors look on as visitors wander through Alamo Plaza.Related: City Council Approves Conceptual Alamo
Plan

Lobby for the the Federal Building to be “donated” to the Alamo Endowment. Then use the building for the best purpose.
Part of the Hotel Gibbs might still pose a problem, since the wall comes very close there.

We have many memorials and plaques around the Alamo, including ones to the Immortal 32 and to Susanna Dickinson, the
Japanese Memorial, the Toribio Losoya bust and plaque, and others. I recommend placing them in an area where they can
be highlighted – maybe another amphitheater with a video about each one.

When rebuilding the walls, there should be several locations where parts of the wall – for instance, 10-16 feet long – could
be rolled back a few feet, then rolled to the side, thereby creating an entryway that wouldn’t be noticeable unless the wall
was “open.” This would allow access by service vehicles and also might be a future entry location into the Alamo.

The decision time is coming on how to do the next step in redeveloping the Alamo site. Future decisions include whether to
close South Alamo Street, and whether the City will give that land to the Alamo Endowment. But the “big stuff” comes later.
I’m betting that logic will prevail, and when it comes time to fund this critically important project, we’ll end up with some-
thing like I’ve described above, except the domed part hasn’t caught on – yet.

So pay the consultants and thank them for their sincere efforts. Then take what they’ve done and do the “Texas” thing –
make it right!

About Richard Weitzel


Richard Weitzel is the immediate past president of the Alamo Chapter of “The Sons of the Republic of Texas,” and currently
the organization's marketing officer. He is president of his company SSTS, Inc., a “Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small
Business” (SDVOSB).
The "OUTSIDE THE ALAMO, Songs of Ned Huthmacher Performed by John Beland" CD Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/OutsideTheAlamo/
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Sat Sep 30, 2017 6:15 am

We have an Alamodome in San Antonio, so why not have a domed Alamo?


And what if repairs will be needed at some point in the future, which will probably be the case? Tear down the dome?
I think a dome would make the Alamo look somewhat Disneyfied.

...small amphitheaters at historically significant areas of the Alamo, such as where Travis
fell, where Crockett fell, the Immortal 32,...


Who knows where Crockett and the immortal 32 fell?

...relocate the front walls backward about 30 feet to
clear room for the restored Alamo wall to be rebuilt.


I trust he means moving all of the three buildings 30 feet back?
Recuerden El Alamo!
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:43 am

In remembering the Alamo, George P. Bush is forced to defend himself
state-government


By Jonathan Tilove - Austin American-Statesman Staff
Sunday, October 8, 2017

SAN ANTONIO —

Land Commissioner George P. Bush stood on a temporary platform in Alamo Plaza in the midst of what 181 years ago was a battleground in the
seminal moment in Texas history.

“You may not have known it, but you stand on sacred ground, but it doesn’t look very sacred, does it?” Bush said to the small audience that was
gathered Monday to hear about efforts to restore seven cannons used in the Battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836.

“So we must restore the battlefield to honor the Alamo’s gallant defenders,” Bush said as traffic rumbled past the plaza, a vendor selling snow
cones nearby. “We must respect this sacred space. We must and will ensure that 1836 lives here every single day.”

“Simply put, we want to tell the story of the Battle of the Alamo proudly, purposefully and better than we ever have before,” Bush said.

With that, the Houston-born grandson and nephew of presidents answered a mounting tide of online vitriol about his management of the Alamo
and its future that came to a head two weeks ago. The executive committee of the Texas Republican Party, at its quarterly meeting in Austin,
voted 57-1 to rebuke his agency’s stewardship of the Spanish mission turned shrine to Texas liberty.

It is too soon to know whether Bush’s rearticulation of his vision for the 273-year-old stone structure and surroundings will quell an uproar from
tea party activists and descendants of Alamo defenders. At best, he was carelessly safeguarding hallowed ground. At worst, he was seeking to
rewrite Texas history.

“There are forces at work to remake or ‘reimagine’ the history of the Alamo and diminish its inspiring message while the property around it
undergoes renovation to increase profits from tourism,” the GOP resolution states.

It declared that decision-making authorities “shall affirm and emphasize the intrinsic significance of the 1836 battle in telling the story of the
Alamo” and called on Bush’s General Land Office to “voluntarily commit to transparency in finances and operations of the Alamo.”

Monday’s speech effectively launched a Bush counteroffensive against what he described as “allegations and spurious claims” about his
agency’s seven-year $450 million plan to redevelop and improve the historic site with, among other things, a new museum housed in nearby
state-owned buildings and additional historic programming.

A new website, AlamoTruth.com — “Get the Facts” — went live Wednesday, and an extensive radio buy began Thursday promoting the website
and touting Bush’s record on the Alamo — “Commissioner George P. Bush is saving the Alamo so that we can tell the story of the heroic battle
for liberty for years to come.” The website and ad campaign are both paid for by his campaign to win a second term in 2018.

Bush has his work cut out for him.

“They talk sacred, but I don’t see it,” said Lee Spencer White, of Fredericksburg, the founder of the Alamo Defenders Descendants Association
and a direct descendant of Gordon C. Jennings, who was, at 56, the eldest of the defenders to die at the Alamo.

It was an hour after Bush’s appearance Monday at the Alamo, and White was standing by the Alamo Cenotaph, the large granite and marble
monument bearing the names of the defenders who perished at the Alamo, and statues of some of its most famous heroes — William B. Travis,
Jim Bowie, David Crockett and James B. Bonham.

It has stood in Alamo Plaza since it was erected in 1939 — the first thing most visitors to the Alamo see — but under the current though not final
master plan, it would be moved to another location and perhaps some distance off the plaza.

A cenotaph is a tomblike monument to those buried elsewhere, especially one commemorating people who died in a war. In this case, the
defenders were burned in funeral pyres away from the Alamo by Santa Anna’s army.

“The Alamo Cenotaph is our family headstone,” White said. “The Alamo Plaza is our family graveyard.”

“Why not have it where they bled and died, where their souls left this earth to heaven?” White said. “Leave the cenotaph where it sits. It’s sitting
where it should be.”

White, whose group will be holding a demonstration at the cenotaph at noon next Saturday, fears that “boot-kicking” the monument blocks away
would remove it from the Alamo experience of most visitors.

“Tourists are not going to see it obviously,” she said — they won’t even know it exists.

Ultimately, decisions about what to do with the Alamo and adjacent areas rest with Bush, a Republican, and San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg, an
Independent who was elected in June. While Bush’s vision for restoring the battlefield depends on moving the cenotaph elsewhere, its fate
depends more on the mayor because it belongs to the city. It is hard to imagine the cenotaph going quietly.

“If they move that cenotaph, it will be an absolute political nightmare for George P. Bush and the mayor of San Antonio,” said Oklahoman Ron
Jackson, who got to know White when he was writing his book, “Alamo Legacy: Alamo Descendants Remember the Alamo.”

“George P. Bush’s political future hangs in the balance,” Jackson said.

‘Not reimagining the history of the Alamo’

By all rights, Bush should be sitting pretty. The scion of one of America’s great political dynasties, he won more than 60 percent of the vote in
his first run for elective office in 2014. Two years later he was the state GOP’s victory chairman — the member of the Bush family who had
made his peace with Donald Trump, who had humiliated his father — the early front-runner for the Republican nomination — as “Low Energy”
Jeb.

Forty-one and handsome, a Bush with a Mexican-born mother, he seemed the perfect person to lead Texas Republicans into the future.

But the Bush name, at this moment in Texas political history, is a burden with the Republican base, a relic of a kind of genteel establishment
out of favor with the populist, tea party and Trump grassroots.

In an act of daring early in his tenure, the generally cautious Bush wrested control of the Alamo from the Daughters of the Republic of Texas,
alleging mismanagement.

Bush had been warned that anything he tried to do with the Alamo would be at his peril. Previous attempts to restore and improve the state’s
most visited historic site have failed.

“To be honest with you, when I came into office, that was exactly what was explained to me, not only by people in the (General Land Office)
but people in San Antonio and throughout the state and the country — there’s no way you can ever restore and reclaim the battlefield of 1836,”
Bush told the American-Statesman. “I viewed it as not only the priority of my first term but a challenge to take on.

“Even if I’m unsuccessful, so be it,” Bush said. “At least I’ll go down and be known as somebody who tried to reclaim the original battlefield.”

Douglass McDonald, the Alamo CEO since August, offered a robust defense of Bush’s leadership.

“Every Texan should keep their eye on what happens at the Alamo,” McDonald said. “The Alamo defines Texas in many respects. The church
itself is probably the most important artifact in the state of Texas.”

And, McDonald said, “If Texans pay careful attention to the facts and what we’re doing, they will be delighted. And the facts are we’re fully
transparent. And the facts are that the centrality of the 1836 battle will always be central to the Alamo — always has been, always will be.

“We are not reimagining the history of the Alamo. We are reimagining the experience people have when they come to the Alamo, so when
you come to Alamo, if you were here yesterday, you wouldn’t be trying to listen to people talk about 1836 cannons, Texas revolutionary
cannons, and have two barking preachers telling you that you’re going to hell in the background,” he said. “So anybody who credibly looks
at the facts and looks at the decisions that have been made will realize and come to the understanding that what we’re were doing is to the
betterment of the Alamo.”

Jerry Patterson, Bush’s predecessor as land commissioner, stirred some of the discontent with a June piece in San Antonio’s Rivard Report —
“Don’t Like a Reimagined Alamo? Time to Put Up or Shut Up” — in which he wrote that then-Alamo chief planner, George Skarmeas, had said,
“The events of 1836 were just one small chapter in 10,000 years of history.”

McDonald said that was cherry-picking an unrepresentative quote. McDonald provided the Statesman with a Sept. 8 letter to the Alamo Master
Plan Management Committee, from Skarmeas and a partner, describing the 1836 battle as “one of the most significant events in not only
American history but world history” and the necessity to restore “dignity and reverence” to a “sacred site.” (McDonald said Skarmeas is still
working on restoring the church but is no longer involved in guiding the broader restoration effort.)

Patterson agrees that many of the concerns articulated by skeptics are unfounded.

“There’s nobody changing the name of the Alamo. There’s nobody that’s going to create a Disneyland, but that’s what happens when you
allow things to fester — imaginations run wild,” Patterson said. “People believe the U.N. is going to take over the Alamo or UNESCO is in control.
That’s absolutely bogus. UNESCO will not be in control.

“But those kinds of things are circulating because you got to get ahead of these things. When things start going south, you let them get
momentum, it makes it much more difficult to get things straight,” said Patterson, who early in Bush’s tenure said his successor should “put
more focus on doing his job and less on covering his derriere.”

“Particularly when there’s nothing to hide. There’s no malfeasance. There’s no hanky-panky. There’s no money under the table,” Patterson
said.

Transparency questions

The viral concerns about a United Nations takeover of the Alamo stemmed from UNESCO granting the Alamo, along with four other San Antonio
missions, a World Heritage Site designation in 2013 when Patterson was commissioner, meaning it has been identified as a significant historic
and cultural site.

“Horse hockey,” Patterson said of U.N. takeover talk at the time.

And yet, four years later, there was the Texas Republican Party executive committee voting, “Be it further resolved that Texas’ authority
regarding the Alamo shall not be infringed upon by any organization or authority, including but not limited to local governments, the federal
government, the United Nations, or UNESCO.”

On the transparency concerns, Bush, who is also chairman of Alamo Complex Management, the nonprofit he set up to replace the Daughters
of the Republic to manage the Alamo, told the Statesman on Monday that going forward the group would provide information beyond what is
legally required by open records laws, from which nonprofits are shielded.

“In terms of PIRs, in terms of minutes and other documents within the (Alamo Complex Management), the position of legal counsel has been
that it is not disclosable, which legally is correct, but I have made the decision as chairman to turn over everything,” he said. “There’s
nothing to hide.”

“We’re now setting up a website for more speedy communications of that material to the media,” he said.

McDonald said that the use of tax dollars by Alamo Complex Management has always been publicly available.

“So let me be perfectly clear, 100 percent of every state of Texas dollar spent here at the Alamo is a public record, always has been a public
record, and any request for those public records has always been granted, 100 percent,” McDonald said.

The Alamo does not charge admission, but receipts from the gift shop, the $300,000 collected annually in the donation boxes by the door and
even the pennies in the fountain are sent to the state, and the state then sends the money to the General Land Office, which reimburses the
Alamo for its expenses. Those reimbursements are a public record, though they are more difficult to obtain than if the work were performed
by the General Land Office itself.

Patterson believes it would have been simpler and more transparent if, after the Daughters of the Republic were removed as stewards of the
Alamo, the General Land Office had run the Alamo itself. McDonald explained that “private organizations can react faster, be more flexible
and hold higher levels of accountability. The public benefits with higher effectiveness and lower tax subsidies utilizing private nonprofits.”

By setting up Alamo operations outside state government, the nonprofit employees aren’t counted as state employees, which allows Bush to
tout his efforts to cut staff positions and streamline the agency.

In contracts between the General Land Office and the three nonprofits at the Alamo, obtained by the Statesman through requests under the
Texas Public Information Act, Bush signs for the General Land Office and two Alamo nonprofits, both of which he initially chaired.

“I’d have concerns about conflicts of interest and conflicts of fiduciary duty,” Patterson said. “If there’s no chance of a conflict or dispute,
why would you need a contract? I would not have contracted with myself to run the Alamo.”

But McDonald said he has been assured by the Alamo Complex Management legal counsel at Dykema Cox Smith that what Bush did is neither
unusual nor problematic, that in each case it is the entity that is a party to the agreement and not Bush as an individual.

‘We have to keep politics out of it’

The next step in redeveloping the Alamo is hiring a design firm.

In May, the San Antonio City Council approved moving forward with the master plan, but, Nirenberg said, that didn’t mean it agreed to all
details.

Ultimately, the City Council would have to vote to convey the plaza, which is city property, to the state and agree to road closures to remove
vehicular traffic from the immediate area.

The master plan calls for repairing the aging cenotaph and moving it to a small park some blocks away that was reputedly the site of one of
the funeral pyres where bodies of defenders were burned, though White questions that claim.

McDonald said restoring the battlefield requires relocating the monument.

“We’re trying to reclaim the battlefield and remove from it all nonhistoric architectures and objects as much as possible, so the cenotaph can
be moved, and moved in a way that gives attention to all the people that are memorialized on it,” McDonald said. “You can have the names
of the people who were left off added, and we think we can add exhibits around it.”

McDonald also said the “free speech zone” now on the plaza needs to be relocated. But Nirenberg told the Statesman, “I believe there is a way
to ensure that there is a respect and a reverence for the site and all of the history on that site without closing of the public nature for free
speech.”

On the centotaph, Nirenberg said, “The significance of the cenotaph had less to do with where it was than the actual symbolism of it, and that
the bigger problem with the cenotaph is that it is falling apart and we have to deal with that issue.”

“I am in favor of moving it,” Nirenberg said. “I’m open to hearing objections, but to this point, they don’t outweigh the needs for making sure
it’s secure in a different site.”

Nirenberg said his relationship with Bush on the endeavor is very good.

“We’re in a very positive place,” Nirenberg said. “There’s a cooperation and a partnership that exists with the state for the redevelopment of
the site that’s never occurred in our history before, and it’s a very delicate balance that we have to be sure addresses public concerns and also
keeps politics out of the process.

“Out of respect for the centuries of history as well as the many people who have tried and attempted to really restore the Alamo, we have to
keep politics out of it,” Nirenberg said.

That’s proving to be difficult.

On Sept. 30, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz appeared at a NE Tarrant Tea Party Event, at which he was asked, “Where do you stand on the Texas land
commissioner’s plan to reimagine the Alamo?”

Cruz and Bush are friends and allies. Bush backed Cruz in his 2012 runoff against David Dewhurst. But his answer suggested that the safest
political course is not to rise publicly to Bush’s defense.

“Well, I will confess that I know a lot of people are concerned about the Alamo. Now, look, the Alamo is a priceless Texas treasure, and it
needs to be preserved for generations to come,” Cruz said. “And I think the people of Texas should be very vocal defending the Alamo. I
think that is important.

“I confess I haven’t studied the details of the particular plan,” Cruz said. “I know people have very real concerns, and the wonderful thing
about our democratic process is that people have the opportunity to express our concerns and make them clear.”

FIRST READING: ‘We ain’t doing diddly squat,’ Ted Cruz tells fellow Republicans

That’s what Ray Myers, a tea party activist from Kaufman County, was doing back in April when he called a statewide Republican elected
official he knows to express his concern that all the members of the Alamo Endowment board, one of the nonprofits Bush chaired, were
“fat cats” and lacked a grassroots voice like his own. (McDonald said the board, through the Remember the Alamo Foundation, will be
launching a $200 million fundraising campaign once the project is a go, and that those donors will not be a public record.)

Myers said that soon after, Bush called to thank him for his interest and then Ash Wright, Bush’s political director, called and answered
some questions. “Endowment board members are all native Texans with significant business and philanthropic experience,” Wright
wrote to Myers in an email. “In addition, each member of the board is asked to raise or give a minimum of $250,000 for the endowment.”

“Who can afford $250,000 to be on that committee to be the watchful eye?” said Myers, a retired teacher.

On Oct. 14, Myers and some allies will be headed to San Antonio to join members of the Alamo Defenders Descendants Association at the
demonstration for the cenotaph.

“What we’re hearing now is the city of San Antonio is going to move the cenotaph in broad daylight, right in front of everybody,” Myers
said Friday.

“We don’t trust the city of San Antonio there at all,” Myers added. “That gives us pause.”

‘All history is contested’

With Confederate statues coming down all over the country, Myers worries that slavery will be used as an excuse to discredit the heroes
of the Alamo — “for something that was just as common in its day as football is today.”

“Bowie had a slave there that stayed with him,” Myers said. “Travis was standing right next to his slave when he was killed.”

While he said he heard Bush made a very good speech Monday, Myers remains concerned.

“We don’t want the battle diminished,” Myers said, recalling the story of Travis drawing a line in the dirt a few days before the battle
and asking those who were prepared to fight — and die — with him in the Alamo to cross it.

“One hundred eighty-seven men stepped over a line right there, and that line in the sand that Travis drew is as deep as the Grand
Canyon,” Myers said.

Myers was paraphrasing the famed Texas historian J. Frank Dobie, who said, “It is a line that not all the piety nor wit of research will
ever blot out. It is a Grand Canyon cut into the bedrock of human emotions and historical impulses.”

But did Travis really draw that line in the dirt?

The story is based largely on the recollection years later of Susanna Wilkerson Dickinson, one of the few survivors of the Battle of the
Alamo.

But another survivor was Travis’ slave Joe, the subject of a book, “Joe the Slave Who Became an Alamo Legend,” co-authored by Ron
Jackson and Lee Spencer White. Joe’s firsthand account of what happened at the Alamo, delivered at the time, informs much of what
we know today, Jackson said, and Joe said nothing about a line in the dirt.

“If we can’t argue about whether Travis really drew a line in the sand, then what’s the fun of it?” McDonald said. “All history is contested.
If it’s not contested, if it’s not challenged, it’s really not very valid.

“To me the right museum exhibit is to actually present the records on both sides, because it helps people understand that we can’t know
all this precisely with certainty,” he said. “That’s what we do as a history institution, tell the history as best we understand it, knowing
that it will evolve.”

In the meantime, McDonald has no concerns that the Alamo will fall victim to historical revisionism that so many latter-day defenders of
the Alamo seem so anxious about.

“Civil War statues are coming down,” he said. “This is not the Civil War. And I’m confident that between the state of Texas and the
Alamo Rangers, all of these things are quite safe.”
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:15 pm

I wrote a brilliant response to the article posted above, but by the time I hit "submit" my login had timed out, or I was never logged in in the first
place. :(

My basic point was that people are unhappy with Commissioner Bush and the Reimagine project because they've raised a lot of money, spent a lot
of money, made some bad and unpopular decisions, had countless meetings, given many speeches, and so far, very little has changed. Apparently
talk is not cheap after all. When people see the finished project. and if they like it, then Commissioner Bush can get his attaboy pat on the back. :)
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:24 pm

I mentioned this on the thread "Rick Range's Save the Alamo Website", but I thought I'd mention it here, too.
Rick sent out emails to let us know that GLO Commissioner Bush has started a second website to defend the GLO Alamo master plan, and they have ripped off Rick's opposition site's name (savethealamo.us) by calling the new GLO site "savethealamo.com".
In response, I have sent an online GLO employee complaint, to the GLO, about GLO employee George P. Bush.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:15 pm

WindersAlamoQuestions.jpg
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Battling Misconceptions at the Alamo
Dr. Bruce Winders, Alamo Historian & Curator

The one thing that I’ve learned after being at the Alamo for twenty-one years is that there is a great amount of misinformation surrounding our state’s
most treasured site. These ideas are often held by people who care passionately about the site and its history. My task as the Alamo’s curator and
historian is to help separate fact from fiction so that visitors understand what has taken place here and why it matters.

Once, I spoke with a visitor who insisted that David Crockett was just a cartoon character. Clearly this person was mistaken, despite the strength of his
conviction. Knowing that Crockett was a real person is important to the Alamo’s story.

Another time, a representative from a prominent lingerie company wanted to use the Alamo as a backdrop for a photo shoot because it made such a
picturesque setting. The pastel lighting they planned to use, he said, would make it look divine. We asked him if they would do something like that at
the Vietnam War Memorial. He replied that, of course they wouldn’t, because it wouldn’t be right. Our director then pointed out that was the same reason
there would be no lingerie shoot at the Alamo. Facts and tone are important to us.
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I have dealt with competing notions of the Alamo for years. The fact is, what the Alamo means to one person may not be what it means to someone else
at all. Any effort to make changes at the site immediately causes devotees to put up their guards and prepare to defend their respective positions.

Today’s battle is being fought on the internet. The current Alamo master plan has generated a flurry of comments that are being expressed on social
media. In an effort to set the issue straight, I’d like to clarify what is really happening by addressing some questions we are currently being asked.

First, no, the Alamo is not being re-named. In the early 1800s, when the Alamo was no longer being used as a mission, a troop of Spanish presidial soldiers
from Alamo de Parras occupied the compound. It then became known as the Alamo, and its name remains the Alamo today. Some claim there are plans to
go back to the mission name, but that has never been proposed.

Second, the 1836 battle is central to the site’s history and will remain so. Every day at the Alamo, we tell the story of the 1836 siege and battle. A key
element of the plan is to define the footprint of the historic battlefield, allowing us to introduce even more educational programs into the area for visitors
and school groups, living history, and ceremonies and activities that honor the site and the men who died here.

There is also false information about the physical setting and environment in which the site will exist. The plans are to remove the “carnival-like atmosphere”
that now greets visitors, not expand it. Today, the 1836 battlefield is covered with asphalt streets and sidewalks. Cars and buses drive across it every day.
Have you ever tried to talk to school children in the plaza or conduct a tour there over the street noise? I have, and it’s extremely difficult and challenging.
Most visitors do not realize they are standing on sacred ground.

The goal is to create a space where visitors can learn and reflect on their experience. Restoring reverence to the battlefield will only happen when greater
control is placed over traffic, street preachers, boxing matches, etc. The creation of the 20,000 square feet of dynamic 1836 battle exhibits in the Crockett
Block and the adjacent buildings will drastically alter the current environment, making it clear to visitors that the Alamo has a larger historical footprint than
they imagined. The tone will improve.

Most importantly, though, preservation of the Alamo’s historic structures is the plan’s first and most urgent priority. Scientific studies have been conducted
on the church and the long barrack, and conservation specialists are reviewing their findings in order to develop strategies to preserve their integrity.
Additionally, an archeological component will be built into the plan so we can continue to learn about the Alamo that lies just below the surface. Both are
indicative that the General Land Office is taking seriously its responsibility to safeguard the Alamo for future generations.

As we saw with the tabling of the early structural glass wall concept, the plan is still evolving, and will continue to do so for some time. I am certain, however,
that what moves forward will be innovative, thoughtful, and appropriate for an important historical icon like the Alamo.

People are passionate about the Alamo. This is why there have been several plans over the years to reinterpret Alamo Plaza as a more meaningful and reverent
site. The current master plan intends to do just that: Revitalize the space while returning reverence to what we all agree is hallowed ground.

The Alamo deserves a thoughtful and truthful planning process. Until more official information comes out, let’s remember Winston Churchill’s admonishment
that, “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.”
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby RLC-GTT on Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:16 pm

BRAVO, BRUCE!!!!


Battling Misconceptions at the Alamo
Dr. Bruce Winders, Alamo Historian & Curator

The one thing that I’ve learned after being at the Alamo for twenty-one years is that there is a great amount of misinformation surrounding our state’s most treasured site. These ideas are often held by people who care passionately about the site and its history. My task as the Alamo’s curator and historian is to help separate fact from fiction so that visitors understand what has taken place here and why it matters.

Once, I spoke with a visitor who insisted that David Crockett was just a cartoon character. Clearly this person was mistaken, despite the strength of his conviction. Knowing that Crockett was a real person is important to the Alamo’s story.

Another time, a representative from a prominent lingerie company wanted to use the Alamo as a backdrop for a photo shoot because it made such a picturesque setting. The pastel lighting they planned to use, he said, would make it look divine. We asked him if they would do something like that at the Vietnam War Memorial. He replied that, of course they wouldn’t, because it wouldn’t be right. Our director then pointed out that was the same reason there would be no lingerie shoot at the Alamo. Facts and tone are important to us.

I have dealt with competing notions of the Alamo for years. The fact is, what the Alamo means to one person may not be what it means to someone else at all. Any effort to make changes at the site immediately causes devotees to put up their guards and prepare to defend their respective positions.

Today’s battle is being fought on the internet. The current Alamo master plan has generated a flurry of comments that are being expressed on social media. In an effort to set the issue straight, I’d like to clarify what is really happening by addressing some questions we are currently being asked.

First, no, the Alamo is not being re-named. In the early 1800s, when the Alamo was no longer being used as a mission, a troop of Spanish presidial soldiers from Alamo de Parras occupied the compound. It then became known as the Alamo, and its name remains the Alamo today. Some claim there are plans to go back to the mission name, but that has never been proposed.

Second, the 1836 battle is central to the site’s history and will remain so. Every day at the Alamo, we tell the story of the 1836 siege and battle. A key element of the plan is to define the footprint of the historic battlefield, allowing us to introduce even more educational programs into the area for visitors and school groups, living history, and ceremonies and activities that honor the site and the men who died here.

There is also false information about the physical setting and environment in which the site will exist. The plans are to remove the “carnival-like atmosphere” that now greets visitors, not expand it. Today, the 1836 battlefield is covered with asphalt streets and sidewalks. Cars and buses drive across it every day. Have you ever tried to talk to school children in the plaza or conduct a tour there over the street noise? I have, and it’s extremely difficult and challenging. Most visitors do not realize they are standing on sacred ground.

The goal is to create a space where visitors can learn and reflect on their experience. Restoring reverence to the battlefield will only happen when greater control is placed over traffic, street preachers, boxing matches, etc. The creation of the 20,000 square feet of dynamic 1836 battle exhibits in the Crockett Block and the adjacent buildings will drastically alter the current environment, making it clear to visitors that the Alamo has a larger historical footprint than they imagined. The tone will improve.

Most importantly, though, preservation of the Alamo’s historic structures is the plan’s first and most urgent priority. Scientific studies have been conducted on the church and the long barrack, and conservation specialists are reviewing their findings in order to develop strategies to preserve their integrity. Additionally, an archeological component will be built into the plan so we can continue to learn about the Alamo that lies just below the surface. Both are indicative that the General Land Office is taking seriously its responsibility to safeguard the Alamo for future generations.

As we saw with the tabling of the early structural glass wall concept, the plan is still evolving, and will continue to do so for some time. I am certain, however, that what moves forward will be innovative, thoughtful, and appropriate for an important historical icon like the Alamo.

People are passionate about the Alamo. This is why there have been several plans over the years to reinterpret Alamo Plaza as a more meaningful and reverent site. The current master plan intends to do just that: Revitalize the space while returning reverence to what we all agree is hallowed ground.

The Alamo deserves a thoughtful and truthful planning process. Until more official information comes out, let’s remember Winston Churchill’s admonishment that, “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.”
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby RLC-GTT on Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:18 pm

BRAVO, BRUCE!!!!! Finally!
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Wed Oct 18, 2017 10:30 pm

NefariousNed wrote:
WindersAlamoQuestions.jpg

Battling Misconceptions at the Alamo
Dr. Bruce Winders, Alamo Historian & Curator


The Alamo deserves a thoughtful and truthful planning process. Until more official information comes out, let’s remember Winston Churchill’s admonishment
that, “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.”




First, I wish to make it plain that I have great respect for Dr. Bruce Winders, and, other than my first paragraph, my concerns and disagreements are concerning the Texas GLO and San Antonio's City Council and their plans for the Alamo.

“A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.”, though often attributed to Winston Churchill, it is not an actual Winston Churchill quote. I think the quote was first incorrectly attributed to him in the 1980's, and despite many efforts to correct the record, the correction is apparently still struggling to put its corrective pants on. ;)

I can only evaluate the Alamo plans by decisions already made and by the progress we've seen so far.
The master planner came up with such an objectionable plan that his role has been reduced to preserving the existing Alamo structures.
There was talk of closing off Alamo street to vehicle traffic, but there has been a lot of push-back from San Antonio's citizens who want the street to stay open. So, the closing of Alamo Street is not a done deal. In the meantime, the city continues to hold events such as bike races and marathons atop the ground supposedly held in sacred reverence.
No rebuilding of any Alamo walls will be permitted.
The GLO purchase of the so-called "Crockett Block" was heralded for its plan to end the carnival atmosphere on Alamo Plaza. Somehow, saving the facades of those 3 commercial buildings occupying sacred Alamo ground became a priority. The conversion of those 3 buildings into a "world class museum" is something I'll believe when I see it.
I understand the stated reasons for moving the cenotaph monument, but I disagree with them. I prefer that it be repaired and remain in Alamo Plaza as part of the reverencing of that sacred ground.

Rumors about changing the Alamo's name, or about the United Nations taking control of the Alamo, are not the deepest concerns that most people have with the Alamo master plan for the Alamo's future. It feels like there is a great opportunity to restore the Alamo physically and emotionally in a most dignified and honorable way. Though there is much talk of reverence for the Alamo and of honor for the people who made the Alamo worth remembering, the GLO and the City of San Antonio have been making decisions that are contrary to their stated goals.

I truly hope that this project works out for the best. I do not have confidence in the people who are running the show.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Thu Oct 19, 2017 2:34 am

Well said, Bruce Winters!

The conversion of those 3 buildings into a "world class museum" is something I'll believe when I see it.


It´ll probably happen for at least two reasons. One, they´ve bought the buildings. Two, they have to return Phil Collins collection if they don´t establish a museum for it.
It will of course take some years to convert the three building into a museum, create the exhibits and open the doors to the public, not to mention getting the funding for it all, which I believe is supposed to come from private people and foundations. In any case we will be rid of the carnival atmosphere, which is a big thing in itself and one we have been complaining about for years, if not decades.

Rumors about changing the Alamo's name, or about the United Nations taking control of the Alamo, are not the deepest concerns that most people have with the Alamo master plan for the Alamo's future.


Maybe not, but both were debated passionately at length by many people. First it was the UN taking control thing and recently it was the Alamo name change thing. All it takes is for someone to warn about a scenario he fears is about to take place and "everybody" are up in arms without questioning the scenario.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:23 am

San Antonio Express News, Saturday, October 21, 2017
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:23 pm

San Antonio Express New, Tuesday, October 24, 2017
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Wed Oct 25, 2017 2:01 pm

Patrick, Straus Direct Legislature to Research Harvey, Alamo Ahead of 2019 Session
Matthew Choi Matthew Choi, Texas Tribune 23 hours ago
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A $450 million renovation and preservation project is slated for the Alamo, surrounding plaza, and nearby buildings.
Updated 22 hours ago

Texas House Speaker Joe Straus charged almost all House committees on Monday to research issues related to Hurricane Harvey recovery in advance of the next legislative session.

The assignments focus largely on the storm’s long-term impacts on the state’s public services and on preventive measures for future disasters. Straus had previously assigned the House Appropriations, Public Education and Natural Resources committees to research a list of issues concerning hurricane relief on Sept. 14. Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick had also charged state Senate committees to look into 25 issues related to Harvey recovery on Sept. 28.

Nearly all House committees were charged with at least one issue directly related to the storm and under their purview to research. The House Committee on Agriculture and Livestock, for example, is charged with mitigating damage and assessing possible protective measures against future natural disasters for the state’s agriculture. And the House Committee on Land and Resource Management will examine whether local and state zoning rules “provide an adequate balance of disaster preparedness and deference to private property rights.”

The committees will report their findings to their respective chambers of the Legislature before the next legislative session begins in January 2019.

“The House will work on a broad range of issues over the next year,” Straus said in a news release. “The work in the months ahead will help ensure that taxpayer dollars are being used properly, that state agencies are meeting the state’s needs and that our private-sector economy is prepared for continued growth.”

The Harvey-related assignments are among more than 230 issues Straus ordered House committees to research Monday in preparation for the next legislative session.

Patrick also ordered Senate committees to research an additional 81 issues on Monday, including directing the Finance Committee to review funding of the Alamo, which has been at the center of controversy amid Land Commissioner George P. Bush’s efforts to restore the landmark.

“I want to ensure the funds allocated for the Alamo are spent to emphasize the historical impact of that legendary battle on the development of Texas as a nation and as a state,” Patrick added.

Bush expressed excitement and gratitude for the attention directed toward the Alamo, saying in a statement to the Tribune on Monday that it will “restore reverence and dignity” to the site of one of the most famous battles in Texas history.

“This was a testament to their dedication to protecting Texas history and encouraging future generations of Texans to remember the sacrifice of the Alamo Defenders who gave their lives for our independence,” Bush said in the statement.

Additionally, Patrick created the Select Committee on Employment Practices to “make recommendations on how to best guarantee the integrity of our state’s workforce,” according to a news release Monday. The state Senate passed a bill last session that would penalize state contractors that do not verify their employees’ immigration status through E-Verify. The bill failed to reach Gov. Greg Abbott, but Patrick’s new committee will attempt to readdress the bill’s objectives.

Straus also announced the creation of the Select Committee on Opioids and Substance Abuse to research the scope and effects of substance abuse in Texas. State Rep. Four Price, R-Amarillo, will chair the committee, and Rep. Joe Moody, D-El Paso, will serve as vice chair.

The new committee on drug abuse is charged with developing “concrete principles and action items to reduce the scourge of opioids” in Texas. In addition to looking at the prevalence of substance abuse, the committee will also assess the currently available options for reducing drug abuse and the challenges of addressing opioid abuse for law enforcement and first responders. It will also investigate drug abuse through state-funded or state-administered programs such as Medicaid.

The committee will continue the substance abuse related work of the Select Committee on Mental Health, which Straus created in November 2015.

“Opioid addiction is a national epidemic that has had a devastating impact on many lives,” Straus said in the news release. “It’s important that we learn more about the prevalence and impact of opioid addiction and other substance abuse issues in Texas.”


This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

About Matthew Choi

Matthew Choi is a reporting fellow at The Texas Tribune and a senior studying journalism and political science at Northwestern University. Matthew has worked as a reporter and editor at The Daily Northwestern since his freshman year, covering administration and faculty, student protests and diversity in campus programs. He has also worked with the Council of American Ambassadors and has a keen interest in foreign policy.
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