Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Matters Of Interest Concerning The Alamo Itself.

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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby warren on Wed Oct 25, 2017 3:54 pm

"Bush expressed excitement and gratitude for the attention directed toward the Alamo, saying in a statement to the Tribune on Monday that it will “restore reverence and dignity” to the site of one of the most famous battles in Texas history."

Bush may have just realized which person has the real power in the state, and it ain't him.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby alamonorth on Fri Oct 27, 2017 10:05 pm

For some current relevant historical information on the century long battle to preserve the Alamo see the article "Making Historical Memory: Women's Leadership in the Preservation of San Antonio's Missions" by Joel Kitchens in the October 2017 issue of the Southwestern Historical Quarterly. The highlight of the article is Adina De Zavala's response to some St Louis businessmen with development on their minds. She boldly stated :" these sacred buildings and grounds were not purchased for the making of a park. "
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:01 pm

San Antonio Express News, Sunday, October 29, 2017


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Patrick orders study of spending on Alamo
Bush’s plan for site faces fresh scrutiny

By Peggy Fikac AUSTIN BUREAU

AUSTIN — Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush’s ambitious plan to “re-imagine” the Alamo is coming under fresh scrutiny after Lt.
Gov. Dan Patrick directed the Senate Finance Committee to delve into state expenditures on the project.

“I want to ensure the funds allocated for the Alamo are spent to emphasize the historical impact of that legendary battle on the development
of Texas as a nation and as a state,” Patrick said Oct. 23.

Bush’s management of the project has stirred some protests, most recently over a proposal to move the Cenotaph, a giant marble and
granite memorial to those killed while defending the Alamo from Mexican troops.

The open plaza would likely be restored to a more authentic space that replicates the the battleground of the Alamo according to
General Land Office spokesman Bryan Preston . The new battle of the Alamo is being fought on the airwaves and via social media,
with websites and resolutions, through protests and news. As demonstrators carry signs saying, "Save the Alamo ", Land Commissioner
George P. Bush is running campaign ads that say he he's trying to do just that .

The Cenotaph was added about a century after the 1836 battle. It would be moved from its spot near the Alamo under a proposal that would
create more open space at the site, although a final decision hasn’t been made on the proposal.

The Alamo, known as the cradle of Texas liberty, is in a busy area of downtown San Antonio. The battle that occurred there can be difficult
to visualize because of development and numerous tourist attractions surrounding the historic buildings.

While the need to repair the Alamo itself isn’t in question, plans for the area around it have raised concerns among some who worry that
there’s an effort to sanitize the battle. Tea party activists have questioned the project’s cost.

Some Bush critics are working to recruit a strong opponent against him in the March 6 Republican primary.

Bush and others have pushed back hard on the accusations, including a rumor that they want to change the Alamo’s name, saying the latter
idea simply never would happen.

Bush praised state leaders for their support of the Alamo work.

“I want to thank Governor Greg Abbott, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, legislative leadership and the members of the Texas Senate and House of
Representatives for working to restore reverence and dignity to the 1836 Alamo Battlefield and preserving both the Alamo Church and
Long Barracks through historic appropriations,” he said. “We are committed to using these funds, provided through their leadership, to
restore the 1836 Battlefield and preserve the Alamo through transparent and responsible stewardship.”

It’s estimated the Alamo master plan would cost about $450 million, with more than $200 million expected to be raised privately by the
nonprofit Alamo Foundation.

The state has allocated $100 million toward the Alamo master plan so far, plus $6.5 million for crucial restoration and day-to-day operations.
The city of San Antonio has committed $38 million.

Patrick’s charge to the Senate Finance Committee said the panel should ensure state funds “are spent to emphasize the architectural design
and the historical impact the battle had on the development of Texas as a nation and as a state.”

The Alamo assignment was one of numerous directives that Patrick and House Speaker Joe Straus, R-San Antonio, made to lawmakers in their
respective chambers Monday, asking them to study and develop recommendations on key issues in advance of the 2019 regular legislative
session.

Straus didn’t include the Alamo on his list of assignments for lawmakers.
pfikac@express-news.net | Twitter: @pfikac
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:17 pm

The open plaza would likely be restored to a more authentic space that replicates the battleground of the Alamo according to
General Land Office spokesman Bryan Preston ...


I don't usually weigh in on this as Alamo news has been changing on an almost daily basis, but as I have been hearing the above quote
chanted over and over again almost like a mantra, I felt compelled to do so.

The big argument for moving the Alamo Cenotaph seems to be that the plaza should be transformed into a boring, empty, pancake-flat
area with no monuments, or much else as this would better reflect the 1836 battleground. My question is, how so? Back in 1836 there
were elevated, entrenched cannon positions and ditches all about the plaza. One such cannon position guarded the main gate of the fort.
So when General Land Office spokesman Bryan Preston says that he wants the plaza restored to a more authentic open space, what does
he actually mean? The Plaza of 1836 was enclosed by walls. How will stripping the current plaza of even a monument change this fact or
make it look more like the battleground of 1836? I am confused. Somebody help me.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:26 pm

Big Express News day for the Alamo today. Four different articles!
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POLITIFACT TEXAS

‘Disappointing’ description of Alamo only half true

By W. Gardner Selby POLITIFACT TEXAS

General Land Office spokeswoman Brittany Eck says they’ve often heard from Alamo visitors who ask, “Is this all there is?”

“The Alamo has been consistently listed as one of the most disappointing landmarks in our nation.”

— George P. Bush on Oct. 16, in the

Alamo Truth website

A website intended to defend the master plan for spiffing up the Alamo says tourists remain far from wowed by the historically
revered site.

We paused at this specific claim in point No. 3 on the Alamo Truth site, which is funded by Texas Land Commissioner George P.
Bush’s political campaign: “The Alamo has been consistently listed as one of the most disappointing landmarks in our nation.”
The point closes: “It is our simple goal to improve the visitor experience for guests and all Texans, including our students.”

No doubt, the Alamo has ragged edges. It’s old. But has it consistently been named one of the country’s most disappointing land-
marks?

Bush, a Republican seeking re-election in 2018, has been overseeing redevelopment of the Alamo along with the private Alamo
Endowment and San Antonio city officials including Mayor Ron Nirenberg, who has said, for instance, that he favors moving the
cenotaph honoring defenders who died there from its place in front of the entrance to another spot on the site.

We asked how Bush reached his conclusion.

Brittany Eck, a General Land Office spokeswoman, initially urged us to Google the words “Alamo,” “disappointing” and “landmark.”
Eck said: “We have routinely heard feedback from people who came to the Alamo, folks saying: ‘Is this all there is?’ ”

When we ran that web search in mid-October, we landed several web posts describing the shrine from the Texas Revolution in
unflattering ways, though positive statements also surfaced.

We noticed that three Texas stories including a May 29 post by Austin Culture Map headlined “Legendary Texas landmark dissed as
worst tourist trap,” keyed off a story published May 19 on the Business Insider website specifying each state’s worst tourist trap.

“Remember the Alamo?” the Texas part of the tourist-trap story says. “More like, spend a day at the Alamo and you’ll remember
to never go back. The building’s remains are so small they consistently disappoint visitors.

“History buffs might get a kick out of it for an hour or so,” the snippet closes, “but looking at a picture will suffice for most.”

In contrast, a San Antonio Express-News rebuff of that story pointed out that as of May, the Alamo, by one measure, was the most-
Instagrammed Texas tourist site, far outpacing the Johnson Space Center.

The Culture Map story further noted a May 8 commentary by Alyssa Morris of the Texas Architect, published by the Houston Chronicle.
During an Alamo visit, Morris wrote, she noticed that few of the site’s original features remained aside from its iconic chapel and
Long Barracks. “But these buildings seem curiously out of place and ignored by the high-rises and parking lots of the modern metropolis
that grew up around them,” Morris wrote. “I texted my co-worker: ‘I don’t get the Alamo. There’s so little educational information
here. It refuses to teach me about itself.’ ”

In May 2015, our search showed, the Thrillist website listed the Alamo among nine “disappointingly small” tourist sites including Mount
Rushmore, Plymouth Rock and the Mona Lisa. Its story said: “The legendary last stand at the Alamo has achieved mythical status in
American/Texas history, causing most people to picture the complex as a sprawling fortress. In reality, not so much — at least not any
more. The original part of this Catholic mission that everybody visits is pretty much an underwhelming 75ft by 62ft building.”

Also from our web search: Comments and ratings of the Alamo as a tourist site posted on the TripAdvisor.com website including, at the
top of the comments when we peeked: “It’s a landmark. It’s history. It’s also in the middle of town and not that informative. We thought
there would be more to see. Glad there are other activities in the area.” Generally, still, the site says that 14,300-plus visitor reviews
have led to the Alamo averaging better than a four-star rating (out of five possible stars).

Our search at Eck’s nudge otherwise turned up mixed comments about the Alamo on a 2007 Democratic Underground thread of comments
including: “I went to see it during a day pass while I was in basic training. It was one of the great disappointments of my life.” Six years
later, also from our search, responses on neogaf-.com about disappointing sites included this post about the Alamo: “Look at it for 5
seconds, then cross the street to eat overpriced tacos.”

So, the Alamo has proved disappointing to some visitors and to writers for a couple of online publications.

Documented disappointment

Following up, Eck shared an undated document she described as compiling feedback about the Alamo fielded by elected officials and others;
negative articles and reviews from online publications; deeper analysis of the TripAdvisor-.com ratings of the Alamo plus screen shots of
negative ratings including expressions of disappointment; and negative reviews of the Alamo posted on Yelp and Facebook.

For our part, we also queried Douglass McDonald, CEO of the Alamo Endowment. By email, McDonald said the Alamo is on his personal list
of “the most disappointing historic sites in the United States. The commercialization of this area has compromised the most important
historic site in Texas,” McDonald wrote. By phone, McDonald called the Alamo the most compromised significant historic site in the nation.
He asked: “Can you imagine having Ripley’s’ Believe It or Not “150 feet from the front door at Mount Vernon? Or an ice cream vendor 50
feet in front of Monticello?”

McDonald also emailed us an undated document he described as created in response to our queries. The document presents more than 30
individual comments posted online about the Alamo from September 2016 into September 2017, all on the negative side. Per the document,
one person wrote: “Very crowded and underwhelming. Go to say you have, but don’t expect it to be earth shattering.” Another: “Glad it’s
free. Really not much to see. 20 minutes and you are done.” And: “We did the audio tour and it just wasn’t interesting. Of course, you can’t
go to San Antonio without seeing The Alamo. It was disappointing.”

McDonald summed up: “As a museum professional, all of this is disturbing, it should be disturbing to every Texan.”

Our ruling

The campaign-funded website says: “The Alamo has been consistently listed as one of the most disappointing landmarks in our nation.”

We’re convinced that plenty of visitors have commented on the Alamo’s surprising small size and how quickly a visit can pass, fueling dis-
appointment. Of late, though, it looks like only the Business Insider and the Thrillist listed the Alamo among the nation’s most disappointing
landmarks.

On balance, we rate this claim Half True: the statement is partially accurate but leaves out important details or takes things out of context.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:40 pm

San Antonio Express News, Sunday, October 29, 2017
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Another battle of the Alamo being waged on the internet

By Bruce Winders FOR THE EXPRESS-NEWS

Bruce Winders: The Alamo master plan is a plan still subject to change.

The one thing that I’ve learned after being at the Alamo for 21 years is that there is a great amount of misinformation surrounding our
state’s most treasured site. These ideas are often held by people who care passionately about the site and its history. My task as the Alamo’s
curator and historian is to help separate fact from fiction so that visitors understand what has taken place here and why it matters.

Once, I spoke with a visitor who insisted that David Crockett was just a cartoon character. Knowing that Crockett was a real person is
important to the Alamo’s story.

Another time, a representative from a prominent lingerie company wanted to use the Alamo as a backdrop for a photo shoot because it made
such a picturesque setting. The pastel lighting they planned to use, he said, would make it look divine. We asked him if they would do something
like that at the Vietnam War Memorial. He replied that, of course they wouldn’t, because it wouldn’t be right. Our director then pointed out that
was the same reason there would be no lingerie shoot at the Alamo. Facts and tone are important to us.

I have dealt with competing notions of the Alamo for years. The fact is, what the Alamo means to one person may not be what it means to some-
one else at all. Any effort to make changes at the site immediately causes devotees to put up their guards and prepare to defend their respective
positions.

Today’s battle is being fought on the internet. The current Alamo master plan has generated a flurry of comments that are being expressed on
social media. I’d like to clarify what is really happening by addressing some questions we are currently being asked.

First, no, the Alamo is not being re-named. In the early 1800s, when the Alamo was no longer being used as a mission, a troop of Spanish presidial
soldiers from Alamo de Parras occupied the compound. It then became known as the Alamo, and its name remains the Alamo today. Some claim
there are plans to go back to the mission name, but that has never been proposed.

Second, the 1836 battle is central to the site’s history and will remain so. Every day at the Alamo, we tell the story of the 1836 siege and battle. A
key element of the plan is to define the footprint of the historic battlefield, allowing us to introduce even more educational programs into the area
for visitors and school groups, living history, and ceremonies and activities that honor the site and the men who died here.

There is also false information about the physical setting and environment in which the site will exist. The plans are to remove the “carnival-like
atmosphere” that now greets visitors, not expand it. Today, the 1836 battlefield is covered with asphalt streets and sidewalks. Cars and buses
drive across it every day. Have you ever tried to talk to school children in the plaza or conduct a tour there over the street noise? I have, and it’s
extremely difficult and challenging. Most visitors do not realize they are standing on sacred ground.

The goal is to create a space where visitors can learn and reflect on their experience. Restoring reverence to the battlefield will only happen when
greater control is placed over traffic, street preachers, boxing matches, etc.

The creation of a new 130,000-square-foot Alamo Museum, which will include dynamic 1836 battle exhibits in the Crockett Block and the adjacent
buildings, will drastically alter the current environment, making it clear to visitors that the Alamo has a larger historical footprint than they
imagined. The tone will improve.

Most importantly, though, preservation of the Alamo’s historic structures is the plan’s first and most urgent priority. Scientific studies have been
conducted on the church and the long barrack, and conservation specialists are reviewing their findings in order to develop strategies to preserve
their integrity. Additionally, an archaeological component will be built into the plan so we can continue to learn about the Alamo that lies just below
the surface.

Both are indicative that the General Land Office is taking seriously its responsibility to safeguard the Alamo for future generations.

As we saw with the tabling of the early structural glass wall concept, the plan is still evolving, and will continue to do so for some time. I am certain,
however, that what moves forward will be innovative, thoughtful, and appropriate for an important historical icon like the Alamo.

People are passionate about the Alamo. This is why there have been several plans over the years to reinterpret Alamo Plaza as a more meaningful
and reverent site. The current master plan intends to do just that: Revitalize the space while returning reverence to what we all agree is hallowed
ground.

The Alamo deserves a thoughtful and truthful planning process.

Until more official information comes out, let’s remember Winston Churchill’s admonishment that, “A lie gets halfway around the world before the
truth has a chance to get its pants on.”

Dr. Bruce Winders is the Alamo’s historian and curator.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Sun Oct 29, 2017 3:59 pm

NefariousNed wrote:San Antonio Express News, Sunday, October 29, 2017
AlamoWinders1.jpg

Another battle of the Alamo being waged on the internet

By Bruce Winders FOR THE EXPRESS-NEWS

Bruce Winders: The Alamo master plan is a plan still subject to change.

...let’s remember Winston Churchill’s admonishment that, “A lie gets halfway around the world before the
truth has a chance to get its pants on.”

Dr. Bruce Winders is the Alamo’s historian and curator.


I think this Express News article is identical to the Bruce Winders article on the ALAMO internet website that was posted on this forum a few days ago on the previous page to this thread.
Though I commented on it when it was first posted, I will add another comment here. The sources of most of the lies and confusion about the Alamo master plan are traceable directly to the GLO and individuals who are responsible for making decisions about the Alamo's future. The myths about changing the Alamo's name and UN taking control and plans to turn it into "Disneyland", are myths that have long ago been debunked and tapped down. Though these myths still occasionally pop up on the internet (where nothing ever dies), they are most often repeated by the GLO and Commissioner Bush on their numerous internet sites. On those GLO and Bush sites, the myths are repeated and debunked, held up like straw men to be easily knocked down.
The GLO is also responsible for other myths that they now take pride in debunking. It was their guy, George Skarmeras, who came up with the idea of glass walls, and this idea has still not been outright rejected. The glass wall idea has been tabled for future discussion. In fact, almost every proposal the GLO has come up with has been transformed from "plans" to merely "proposals". They come up with plans, present them with great fanfare, the citizens reject them, the GLO claims the plans are proposals, then declares their own plans/proposals to be "myths" that crazy people on the internet are just making up.
When these politicians realize that the public doesn't like their plans, and that the public recognizes double talk when they hear and read it, and the public responds by wanting to fire them, i.e., elect someone else, then the politicians say, "Let's not get political!"
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Sun Oct 29, 2017 6:23 pm

NefariousNed wrote:
The open plaza would likely be restored to a more authentic space that replicates the battleground of the Alamo according to
General Land Office spokesman Bryan Preston ...


I don't usually weigh in on this as Alamo news has been changing on an almost daily basis, but as I have been hearing the above quote
chanted over and over again almost like a mantra, I felt compelled to do so.

The big argument for moving the Alamo Cenotaph seems to be that the plaza should be transformed into a boring, empty, pancake-flat
area with no monuments, or much else as this would better reflect the 1836 battleground. My question is, how so? Back in 1836 there
were elevated, entrenched cannon positions and ditches all about the plaza. One such cannon position guarded the main gate of the fort.
So when General Land Office spokesman Bryan Preston says that he wants the plaza restored to a more authentic open space, what does
he actually mean? The Plaza of 1836 was enclosed by walls. How will stripping the current plaza of even a monument change this fact or
make it look more like the battleground of 1836? I am confused. Somebody help me.

It's confusing because the rules and proposals that have been presented are inconsistent in their stated purposes of bringing reverence to the site and restoring the battlefield.

They stated from the outset that no walls or structures can be rebuilt, no matter how historically accurate they might be, because they wouldn't be historically perfect reproductions, and they claim that visitors would be confused between what's original and what's rebuilt. So, planners propose reinterpreted walls and a gate that have no resemblance to the original walls and gate. They claim that the Cenotaph must go, but the west wall commercial buildings must stay. Skarmeas proposed restoring the acequia, exempt from the historical accuracy requirement, though I don't know if that is still on the table.

They are not really restoring the 1836 battlefield. They are taking away the monument, the paving, the dirt, maybe some trees, and a few other things for better or worse. They are adding very little, have no control over some areas such as the north end's Federal Building, and they want to add or preserve things that were not present during the 1836 battle.

At least the monument is connected to the Battle of the Alamo. It honors the defenders who sacrificed their lives on that very ground. I believe that "The Spirit of Sacrifice" monument helps to bring reverence to that sacred ground. That's why the monument was built and placed there in the first place. A big empty Alamo Plaza doesn't inspire reverence nor does it restore Alamo Plaza to the way it looked during the 1836 battle.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:52 am

Alamo defender descendant weighs in on George P. Bush and the Alamo
in today's Express News, Monday, October 30, 2017.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Fri Nov 03, 2017 6:41 am

Hey, Texplainer: Is the United Nations going to take over
the Alamo? No, it isn’t.

Conspiracy theories about the Alamo's future began in 2015 and have re-
emerged more recently as state and local officials consider plans to “re-
imagine” the historic site.

Alex Samuels, The Texas Tribune, Thursday, November 2, 2017

Hey, Texplainer: What is going on with changes to the Alamo? And is it true that the historic site could end up
in foreign hands?

The Alamo has long been known as a historic Texas shrine. Recently, however, the San Antonio landmark has
been the center of controversy, largely stemming from Tea Party activists wary of a new plan to “reimagine”
the historic site.

Conspiracy theories about the Alamo’s future began in July 2015 when the United Nations Educational, Scientific
and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), gave the San Antonio missions, including the Alamo complex, a World
Heritage designation, placing the famed site of the 1836 Battle of the Alamo on par with international landmarks
like the Statue of Liberty and the Acropolis in Athens, Greece.

The Texas General Land Office is tasked with managing the Alamo and surrounding properties. But the UNESCO
designation prompted concerns that the U.N. planned on taking over the Alamo Historic District. Officials have
repeatedly said the designation does not open up the Alamo to any kind of foreign control.

One of the most vocal critics was state Sen. Donna Campbell, R-New Braunfels, who proposed the Protect the
Alamo Act in 2015. While unsuccessful, her measure would have banned any foreign entity from owning,
controlling or managing the Alamo complex. It also would’ve prohibited the Texas General Land Office, which
manages the Alamo and surrounding properties, from entering into a contract that would allow an “entity formed
under the laws of another country” to manage the historic site.

“It's already one of the most recognizable landmarks on the planet,” Campbell said when she outlined her measure.
“The Alamo is the story of Texas. It was there that Texas first stood her ground to be free, and the U.N. doesn't
have any business there.”

Concerns about the Alamo’s future continued to grow as newly-elected Land Commissioner George P. Bush began
prioritizing the site’s renovation that year. Local and state officials have long called for updating the site,
claiming that it often underwhelms visitors and is increasingly overshadowed by the growth and development of
the surrounding city.

“The Alamo is the most important artifact in the state of Texas. It’s the most iconic symbol of Texas independence,”
Douglass McDonald, CEO of the Alamo, said. “From a museum perspective, we look at the preservation of museum
artifacts for perpetuity.”

In December 2015, Bush and members of the Alamo Endowment Board toured three buildings surrounding the Alamo –
the Woolworth, Crockett and Palace buildings – that the state later purchased for $14.4 million.

Last month, Bush unveiled a multi-million-dollar proposal to renovate the Alamo that included quadrupling the site’s
size, restoring historical structures and closing surrounding streets. Local officials have also discussed moving a
cenotaph constructed in 1939 honoring Alamo “defenders” to a location farther from the historic site.

Shortly after Bush unveiled his plans, critics held a “Save the Alamo Cenotaph” rally in San Antonio in which several
participants challenged both Bush’s re-election and efforts to redesign the historic site. On Wednesday, Rick Range,
a self-described “Alamo activist,” announced that he planned to run for land commissioner against Bush in 2018. In
a news release, Range said that “Bush will be every bit as destructive to the Alamo as was the Mexican Army in 1836.”

Along with concerns about redesigning the landmark, some critics thought the new plans to renovate the Alamo —
coupled with the UNESCO designation — meant that the state’s sovereignty over the site was at risk. McDonald called
rumors the U.N. was taking over the Alamo a “perpetuated urban myth.”

“There’s not one shred of basis for making this statement. I see the online caricatures about this and I see the
conversation,” McDonald said. “Texans control the site and that will never change.”

Bush has also tried to quell theories that the Alamo’s future ownership is uncertain.

"To borrow a phrase from the president, there's a whole lot of fake news out there on this," Bush said last month
at the Texas Federation of Republican Women’s conference in Dallas. He directed the audience to visit a new
website set up by his campaign: AlamoTruth.com.

"There you will learn the United Nations will never touch the Alamo,” Bush said. “The Alamo will always belong to
the people of Texas.”

The site asserts that there’s no plan to edit the history or name of the Alamo, but rather to “reimagine” the visitor
experience. It also says that the final Alamo Master Plan has not been approved, and that Bush and San Antonio
Mayor Ron Nirenberg have the power to accept or reject any part of the proposal.

“The following ideas have been developed with Commissioner Bush’s desire to give true honor to those who DIED
FOR TEXAS,” the website reads.

Days later, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick ordered the Senate Finance Committee to review funding of the Alamo.

"I want to ensure the funds allocated for the Alamo are spent to emphasize the historical impact of that legendary
battle on the development of Texas as a nation and as a state," Patrick said.

Bush expressed optimism that the Senate review will bring more attention toward current efforts to "restore
reverence and dignity" to the site of one of the most famous battles in Texas history.

“People make comments about the transparency of funding and every single dollar of state funding is a public
record and always has been a public record,” McDonald said. “Giving us an official forum in which to go gives us
a great platform to extol the virtues of the management and to quell these bogus rumors made up in the public.”

The bottom line: Renovations to the Alamo have been in the works for years. But those changes, along with a 2015
designation by an organization affiliated with the United Nations, have sparked suspicions that the U.N. plans to
take over the historic site. Despite rumors, state officials and Alamo executives insist the site will always be owned
and managed by Texas and that current renovations are intended to preserve the site’s historical significance.

Disclosure: The General Land Office has been a corporate sponsor of The Texas Tribune.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Fri Nov 03, 2017 2:45 pm

Along with concerns about redesigning the landmark, some critics thought the new plans to renovate the Alamo —
coupled with the UNESCO designation — meant that the state’s sovereignty over the site was at risk. McDonald called
rumors the U.N. was taking over the Alamo a “perpetuated urban myth.”

I keep reading and hearing over and over again about the UN and its taking over the Alamo. Who keeps repeating the myth?

http://www.thealamo.org/alamomasterplan/index.html operated by the GLO
http://www.alamotruth.com/ operated by George P. Bush
http://savethealamo.com/faq.html operated by the GLO
http://www.glo.texas.gov/the-glo/news/p ... nesco.html
"I said it two years ago and I'll say it again: The UN will never have any role or influence at the Alamo as long as I am its guardian. I am fully committed to reinforce the story of 1836 and restore reverence to the Cradle of Texas Liberty."

In an email to me, a high ranking employee of the GLO, a woman who has been given great authority over the Alamo master plan, had the audacity to associate the UN myth and other myths with Rick Range's savethealamo.us website. Rick Range's site does not promote any such UN myth. It is the GLO employees, including Commissioner Bush, who keep repeating this myth that was long ago debunked.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:47 pm

A San Antonian vocalizing her displeasure with "Re-Imagine The Alamo".
Hasn't been much on the Master Plan in the paper for awhile.

San Antonio Express News "YOUR TURN" letters to the Editoir section.
November 14, 2017
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:50 am

NefariousNed wrote:A San Antonian vocalizing her displeasure with "Re-Imagine The Alamo".
Hasn't been much on the Master Plan in the paper for awhile.

San Antonio Express News "YOUR TURN" letters to the Editoir section.
November 14, 2017


I seem to have read there will be lots of trees giving shade and benches too in the "new" plaza.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:58 pm

WOAI News Radio, San Antonio

1 day ago

Land Commissioner Bush Just Scrapped Much of the
Alamo Master Plan




Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush is scrapping many of the key parts of that planned Alamo Plaza
redevelopment, News Radio 1200 WOAI reports.

Bush's office owns the Alamo and the so-called 'Crockett Block' of businesses across Alamo Street from the
Alamo, and he said, in an event at the Alamo sponsored by the conservative group Empower Texans that
'I am the boss' and he will have the final say on all aspects the $300 million plus redevelopment effort.

Bush announced the following 'revisions' to the plan, which was first unveiled earlier this year:

1) The Cenotaph will not be moved to a location along the San Antonio River across from the Convention
Center

2) The plexiglas wall that was included in the master plan to deliniate the grounds of the original Alamo
mission will not be built

3) Planners were incorrect when they said the renovation will focus on 'ten thousand years of history.' He
says it will focus on the 1836 battle.

4) Bush says the General Land Office is in negotiations with the City of San Antonio to take control of
Alamo Plaza, which is now city owned space.

5) The Alamo has been threatened by the urban terrorist group 'Antifa.'

First, the Cenotaph. The 1936 monument, which was funded and built by the Daughters of the Republc
of Texas to mark the 100th anniversary, was planned to be moved to the San Antonio River across from
the convention center, which is where the bodies of the Alamo defenders are believed to have been
cremated. Planners said it would provide a 'gateway to the Alamo complex.

'Bush said if the Cenotaph is moved at all, it will only be moved a few yards to the south.

"The only other spot that I can think of is just south of where the south gate is," he said. "That's the
entrance of where the Alamo is. So under the master plan, every single visitor, the two million who
visit the Alamo every year, would pass it and would understand it."

The planners had envisioned a role in the re-imagined Alamo to stress the lives of the Native Americans
who settled along the San Antonio River 10,000 years ago, all the way to the Spanish settlement of the
Southwest, up to the development of San Antonio. But Bush says he wants the redevelopment to focus
on the Battle of the Alamo.

"We are focused on the Battle of 1836, restoring the battlefield, and restoring the church, which is
deteriorating before our very eyes."

Perhaps the most controversial part of the master plan was the plexiglas 'wall' which planners said would
allow visitors to get a 'sense of location' on Alamo Plaza, and reconstruct the original mission wall which
stood during the battle.

Bush says overwhelming opposition to the wall has led him to scrap it.

"In light of that, that concept in on the table, and is no longer in the process, or in the queue, for the
master plan."

Bush also said he would like the City of San Antonio to cede Alamo Plaza to the state, so it can be included
in all major master plan decisions, although Bush said he has a good working relationship with city officials.

And, the Land Commissioner offered this chilling detail:

"We have Antifa (which is a group which claims to oppose President Trump, but has been designated as an
urban terror group by law enforcement). which has said it is going to rally, and plans the desecration of
elements of the Alamo."

Bush stressed he will preserve several other key parts of the Alamo master plan.

He wants to convert the Crockett Block, which includes Ripleys, the wax museum, and other businesses into
a world class museum and visitor center, which will include the Phil Collins Collection of Alamo memorabilia.
He says the plan is to move the businesses to a still to be determined 'entertainment district' near Alamo
Plaza.

Alamo Street will still be closed and a 'main entrance' to Alamo Plaza will be created near the current Corner
of Alamo and Commerce.

Bush stressed he hopes to rid the area of the 'carnival atmosphere' which currently exists, which is not only
distracting from the gravity of the location, but is leading to vehicle traffic which is damaging the Alamo
and the Long Barracks.

While it wont be a plexiglas wall, he hopes to create some form of demarcation area to show where the
Alamo mission walls were located.

He plans to invest millions to repair the Alamo and the Long Barracks and stop its deterioration.

The entire plan is set to cost about $300 million, much of that money raised through private contributions.
The construction is set to begin in 2018 and should be completed by 2024, which is the 300th anniversary
of the establishment of the Alamo at its current location.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:27 pm

ANOTHER VIEW: San Antonio Express News, 11-20-17
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:23 pm

NefariousNed wrote:WOAI News Radio, San Antonio

1 day ago

Land Commissioner Bush Just Scrapped Much of the
Alamo Master Plan




Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush is scrapping many of the key parts of that planned Alamo Plaza
redevelopment, News Radio 1200 WOAI reports.

Bush's office owns the Alamo and the so-called 'Crockett Block' of businesses across Alamo Street from the
Alamo, and he said, in an event at the Alamo sponsored by the conservative group Empower Texans that
'I am the boss' and he will have the final say on all aspects the $300 million plus redevelopment effort.

Bush announced the following 'revisions' to the plan, which was first unveiled earlier this year:

1) The Cenotaph will not be moved to a location along the San Antonio River across from the Convention
Center

2) The plexiglas wall that was included in the master plan to deliniate the grounds of the original Alamo
mission will not be built

3) Planners were incorrect when they said the renovation will focus on 'ten thousand years of history.' He
says it will focus on the 1836 battle.

4) Bush says the General Land Office is in negotiations with the City of San Antonio to take control of
Alamo Plaza, which is now city owned space.

5) The Alamo has been threatened by the urban terrorist group 'Antifa.'

First, the Cenotaph. The 1936 monument, which was funded and built by the Daughters of the Republc
of Texas to mark the 100th anniversary, was planned to be moved to the San Antonio River across from
the convention center, which is where the bodies of the Alamo defenders are believed to have been
cremated. Planners said it would provide a 'gateway to the Alamo complex.

'Bush said if the Cenotaph is moved at all, it will only be moved a few yards to the south.

"The only other spot that I can think of is just south of where the south gate is," he said. "That's the
entrance of where the Alamo is. So under the master plan, every single visitor, the two million who
visit the Alamo every year, would pass it and would understand it."

The planners had envisioned a role in the re-imagined Alamo to stress the lives of the Native Americans
who settled along the San Antonio River 10,000 years ago, all the way to the Spanish settlement of the
Southwest, up to the development of San Antonio. But Bush says he wants the redevelopment to focus
on the Battle of the Alamo.

"We are focused on the Battle of 1836, restoring the battlefield, and restoring the church, which is
deteriorating before our very eyes."

Perhaps the most controversial part of the master plan was the plexiglas 'wall' which planners said would
allow visitors to get a 'sense of location' on Alamo Plaza, and reconstruct the original mission wall which
stood during the battle.

Bush says overwhelming opposition to the wall has led him to scrap it.

"In light of that, that concept in on the table, and is no longer in the process, or in the queue, for the
master plan."

Bush also said he would like the City of San Antonio to cede Alamo Plaza to the state, so it can be included
in all major master plan decisions, although Bush said he has a good working relationship with city officials.

And, the Land Commissioner offered this chilling detail:

"We have Antifa (which is a group which claims to oppose President Trump, but has been designated as an
urban terror group by law enforcement). which has said it is going to rally, and plans the desecration of
elements of the Alamo."

Bush stressed he will preserve several other key parts of the Alamo master plan.

He wants to convert the Crockett Block, which includes Ripleys, the wax museum, and other businesses into
a world class museum and visitor center, which will include the Phil Collins Collection of Alamo memorabilia.
He says the plan is to move the businesses to a still to be determined 'entertainment district' near Alamo
Plaza.

Alamo Street will still be closed and a 'main entrance' to Alamo Plaza will be created near the current Corner
of Alamo and Commerce.

Bush stressed he hopes to rid the area of the 'carnival atmosphere' which currently exists, which is not only
distracting from the gravity of the location, but is leading to vehicle traffic which is damaging the Alamo
and the Long Barracks.

While it wont be a plexiglas wall, he hopes to create some form of demarcation area to show where the
Alamo mission walls were located.

He plans to invest millions to repair the Alamo and the Long Barracks and stop its deterioration.

The entire plan is set to cost about $300 million, much of that money raised through private contributions.
The construction is set to begin in 2018 and should be completed by 2024, which is the 300th anniversary
of the establishment of the Alamo at its current location.


I just looked at the GLO's savethealamo.com site (not to be confused with Rick Range's savethealamo.us site) and it still includes the option of moving the Cenotaph to pyre locations. In the WOAI article, posted above, Commissioner Bush says that the GLO is in negotiations to "take control" of Alamo Plaza which is currently owned by the city. The city owns Alamo Plaza and the Cenotaph. When Bush says "take control", does he mean buy or lease or what? At this point, while still negotiating, Bush and the GLO still have zero control over Alamo Plaza and the Cenotaph, so how can he be so definite in his statements about Alamo Plaza and the Cenotaph's future?

The article also states "he hopes to create some form of demarcation area to show where the Alamo mission walls were located". That's rather vague. It's going to be pretty hard to do, too, since the north wall is in the Federal Building and goes across Alamo Street and into the Indigo Hotel. He's given up the west wall in favor of preserving the facades of the 3 commercial buildings that the GLO owns, so no "demarcation" there. This may not be turning into Disneyland, but it does sound like Fantasy Land to me.

Bush says that the glass walls idea has been scrapped, but then is quoted as saying, "In light of that, that concept is on the table, and is no longer in the process, or in the queue, for the master plan." So, why does he say "that concept is on the table"? Does he mean it's "off the table"? Which is it?

It seems that he is saying what people want to hear, but he is declaring definitive plans for Alamo Plaza and the Cenotaph, while still negotiating for "control". After years of working on a master plan, those plans still are quite vague and not definite. How much time and money has been spent on this master plan that is so vague and indefinite that it can't be committed to or pinned down? All I've seen is shifting public statements from the GLO and Commissioner Bush, and those statements shift as the political winds blow, which shows that there is no real plan.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby James H. Hood on Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:00 pm

SantaClaus wrote:The article also states "he hopes to create some form of demarcation area to show where the Alamo mission walls were located". That's rather vague. It's going to be pretty hard to do, too, since the north wall is in the Federal Building and goes across Alamo Street and into the Indigo Hotel.

Perhaps set back a touch from the actual footprint?

In any event, the palisade and Low Barrack could be done.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:34 pm

James H. Hood wrote:
SantaClaus wrote:The article also states "he hopes to create some form of demarcation area to show where the Alamo mission walls were located". That's rather vague. It's going to be pretty hard to do, too, since the north wall is in the Federal Building and goes across Alamo Street and into the Indigo Hotel.

Perhaps set back a touch from the actual footprint?

In any event, the palisade and Low Barrack could be done.


You're right, the Low Barrack and palisade could be done. In fact, the Low Barrack and south gate are already marked, as well as part of the palisade. It's too bad that the GLO has decided not to rebuild any structures. I wish Commissioner Bush would be specific, or even present some possible options for what the article describes as his "hopes to create some form of demarcation area". The glass walls are scrapped, except that they're still "on the table".
The phrase, "some form of demarcation" just has me stumped. What does that mean?
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby James H. Hood on Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:22 am

Perhaps low walls as at San Juan and Espada?
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:16 am

Re-Imagine that! The Alamo in chains.

As an old friend of mine once noted regarding this sort of over-protectiveness, Commandment #11: "Thou Shalt Not Touch The 'Mo."

I will miss being able to walk along the Long Barrack. :cry:

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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:27 pm

NefariousNed wrote:Re-Imagine that! The Alamo in chains.

As an old friend of mine once noted regarding this sort of over-protectiveness, Commandment #11: "Thou Shalt Not Touch The 'Mo."

I will miss being able to walk along the Long Barrack. :cry:

Photo by Scott Huddleston

When did those chains get installed? :o Are they permanent? :?
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby James H. Hood on Sat Nov 25, 2017 5:59 pm

They were installed on MON 06 NOV 17.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby warren on Sun Nov 26, 2017 5:02 pm

Where me bolt-cutters!
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:44 pm

San Antonio Express News 12-5-17
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Tue Dec 05, 2017 2:53 pm

NefariousNed wrote:San Antonio Express News 12-5-17


Describing today's Alamo as a "vibrant urban space" is a new one on me. Calling the 1836 Alamo a "sterile wasteland" is also a novelty. Closing the street and building walls will not keep people from coming to see the Alamo. Today's visitors are the people who keep that "space" vibrant (with the aid of those who work there to keep history alive). But those visitors are often disappointed by what they see. They want to see the Alamo as it was in 1836. They want to see a battleground and mission/fortress alive with history and legend. They want to see an Alamo dedicated as a Shrine to Liberty. What they see in Alamo Plaza is a sterile urban space dedicated to bicycle races, marathons, raspa carts, and used as a shortcut for local drivers to get to their local destinations. If that's what "the people" of San Antonio want to preserve, and if "the people" see the 1836 Alamo battleground as a "sterile wasteland" void of meaning, then "the people" are rejecting a valuable diamond in favor of a glass bauble.
p.s. I do agree with the writer that the Cenotaph should remain in Alamo Plaza. In fact, I would like to see more statues and cannon (real or replicated) throughout all the 1836 Alamo grounds.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby cc nolen on Tue Dec 05, 2017 3:40 pm

They put up chains and then let people do a crazy dance in front of the shrine??? Something is way wrong with all that.
Just MHO. :roll:
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby James H. Hood on Tue Dec 05, 2017 5:19 pm

Kindly clarify the dancing reference.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:42 am

"The people have spoken. They don´t want a wall..." - That won´t sit well with a lot of Alamo buffs who wants to see the old walls recreated. Or maybe the writer was thinking of the discarded glass walls idea? That must be it because nobody wanted those glass walls. I don´t think "the people" have spoken out against recreating the original walls.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:47 pm

Wednesday, December 6, 2017
San Antonio Express News
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:57 pm

Seguin wrote:"The people have spoken. They don´t want a wall..." - That won´t sit well with a lot of Alamo buffs who wants to see the old walls recreated. Or maybe the writer was thinking of the discarded glass walls idea? That must be it because nobody wanted those glass walls. I don´t think "the people" have spoken out against recreating the original walls.

You are correct. The majority of people who spoke at meetings to comment on the master plan did reject the glass walls. Those objections to the glass walls were so strong that GLO Commissioner Bush has scrapped the glass wall idea and he is now claiming that the glass wall idea is just a myth that he and the GLO are debunking, even though the glass wall idea came from his own master planner.
I think the writer of the article speaks for many San Antonio residents who are against any kind of enclosure and against closing the street running through Alamo Plaza. They want their open "vibrant urban space". Many think of the Alamo as being only the buildings that still stand today or, more specifically, only the Alamo church. To many, the Alamo is just stage scenery, a backdrop for more important events like bike and foot races or an early morning jog. So, no walls or impediments for them. Centuries ago, the Alamo was the frontier. Now, vibrant urban space, the final frontier (to paraphrase Captain Kirk) is all that many locals seek out. :)
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:17 pm

In today's Express News
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Sat Dec 09, 2017 3:24 am

I think the writer of the article speaks for many San Antonio residents who are against any kind of enclosure and against closing the street running through Alamo Plaza. They want their open "vibrant urban space". Many think of the Alamo as being only the buildings that still stand today or, more specifically, only the Alamo church. To many, the Alamo is just stage scenery, a backdrop for more important events like bike and foot races or an early morning jog. So, no walls or impediments for them. Centuries ago, the Alamo was the frontier. Now, vibrant urban space, the final frontier (to paraphrase Captain Kirk) is all that many locals seek out. :)


Right, and that means it will be an uphill battle to persuade people to have the original walls recreated. It looks like they will accept having a museum in the three buildings on the west side and have the Alamo church repaired, and that´s about it. Well, at least we will be rid of the carnival atmosphere and getting an Alamo museum instead.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:35 pm

Do you suppose they will ever get this show on the road? How many more bylaws must be introduced at meetings merely to decide
how the meetings themselves should be conducted?

San Antonio Express News, Tuesday, January 16, 2018
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby Seguin on Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:59 pm

NefariousNed wrote:Do you suppose they will ever get this show on the road? How many more bylaws must be introduced at meetings merely to decide
how the meetings themselves should be conducted?

San Antonio Express News, Tuesday, January 16, 2018


They will debate what the plaza should look like for the next 5 years or so and then they will decide it´s best to leave it as it is. :D
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Fri Jan 19, 2018 12:29 am

NefariousNed wrote:Do you suppose they will ever get this show on the road? How many more bylaws must be introduced at meetings merely to decide
how the meetings themselves should be conducted?

San Antonio Express News, Tuesday, January 16, 2018

I don't think this show will get on the road until a new GLO Commissioner is elected to take charge. Currently, the GLO is on its second out of state company trying to come up with an Alamo master plan. As the article notes, the current company is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri. The first company was from Pennsylvania. That's not to say that people from outside of Texas can't understand the Alamo or come up with a great Alamo master plan. The existence of this forum and the fact that its members come from all over the U.S. and from all over the world demonstrates that people from everywhere understand the Alamo. People everywhere get it. :)
Rick Range understands the Alamo. Jerry Patterson understands. (Patterson's campaign website has Gary Foreman's youtube video.) State Senator Kirk Watson is getting his digs in against Bush partly because Watson will be supporting his own party's candidate in the General Election, but his criticisms of Commissioner Bush are right on target. These are some of the same criticisms that Rick Range and Jerry Patterson have put forward.
Rick Range knows that right here in Texas we already have the archaeologists, historians, engineers, architects, builders, and people who know and understand the Alamo. We don't have to go to Missouri or Pennsylvania. Nothing against those states. Some of the finest people I know come from those states and from other not-Texas lands. ;)
The current GLO Commissioner has demonstrated that he's one of those people who just doesn't get it. I don't think he'll win the Republican Primary on March 6. We'll have to wait until the winner of the General Election takes office in January, 2019. Only then will we see this show finally get on the road.
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby NefariousNed on Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:06 pm

An updated version of the same Scott Huddleston article in today's Express News.
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NefariousNed
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Re: Save/Reimagine Alamo Plaza! Now!

Postby SantaClaus on Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:29 pm

NefariousNed wrote:An updated version of the same Scott Huddleston article in today's Express News.

What a mess!
AFTER the Texas State Senate put Commissioner Bush on the hot-seat, questioning why taxpayer funded meetings and minutes of those meetings were closed to the public, and AFTER State Senators demanded that the meetings and minutes be opened to the public, and AFTER the Texas State Attorney General ruled in May that the meetings and minutes must be open, we now read,

"Doug McDonald, Alamo CEO, said the trust agreed that it must adhere to the information act because it uses state funds, including Alamo gift shop revenues...."
The decision to open board meetings to the public was made voluntarily to assure everyone that there is nothing to hide.
"We don't believe we're required by law to do it," McDonald said. "We want to open the meetings up."


So, who's been holding them back? Why did the Texas Senate have to call in Bush to explain why the meetings were closed? Why did the State Attorney General have to rule that those meetings needed to be open? We need to know how and where the money is and has been spent. We need to have a plan that is right for the Alamo. We need to get this show on the road. It's going to take a new GLO commissioner to get this right.
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