Art of Early Texas

Matters Of Interest Concerning Texas.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby Seguin on Mon Jun 04, 2012 6:01 pm

Sorry, Hans. Each painting takes up two pages in the TIME-LIFE book. Sadly, much of the image is lost in the center crease. (Probably as much as an inch.) The only way to see the paintings in their entirety would be too break the spine, remove the pages and then splice them together.


Right, I know the problem, which unfortunately is very common. They could at least create a white margin around the two halves so that what are lost in the center crease are only the white margins, but it´s of course much easier not to give a damn. :roll:
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:09 am

Today's contribution: Ida Weisselberg Hadra's "Bridge over the San Antonio River." I cut the date off with the scan, but it is the 1880s.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:10 am

Here's another one. "Church at El Paso del Norte" by Henry Cleves Pratt, 1852. (Nope, they aren't all going to be Bexar-themed!)

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby RLC-GTT on Tue Jun 05, 2012 6:16 am

Nefarious wrote:It would be exciting to see these paintings enlarged and then assembled as a square in some museum. By placing the viewer in the very center of the square, it would give them the experience of standing in the center of Main Plaza in 1849. Sort of a cyclorama effect.

Yes. I too have often thought about how cool that would be.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby RLC-GTT on Tue Jun 05, 2012 6:20 am

I've seen (and always liked) the El Paso parish scene, but I've never seen the other one. Craig would know exactly which bridge that was. My closest guess would be the Garden St. Bridge downriver from Bowen's Island and the plazas.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Jun 05, 2012 4:41 pm

RLC-GTT wrote:I've seen (and always liked) the El Paso parish scene, but I've never seen the other one. Craig would know exactly which bridge that was. My closest guess would be the Garden St. Bridge downriver from Bowen's Island and the plazas.

This link to the long overlooked Potrero/Commerce Street Bridge thread may offer some food for thought:
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=872&p=41969#p41941
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby RLC-GTT on Wed Jun 06, 2012 2:36 am

Nefarious wrote:
RLC-GTT wrote:I've seen (and always liked) the El Paso parish scene, but I've never seen the other one. Craig would know exactly which bridge that was. My closest guess would be the Garden St. Bridge downriver from Bowen's Island and the plazas.

This link to the long overlooked Potrero/Commerce Street Bridge thread may offer some food for thought:
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=872&p=41969#p41941

Thanks Ned. I just revisited all 17 pages! Man, we were waxing prolific. :lol: That is a darn good thread, and it certainly did advance our knowledge of at least one detail of the Alamo story -- the "footbridge."
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:03 am

"Independence Hall, Washington-on-the-Brazos," James G. Benton and Charles L. Smith, 1852.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:04 am

Detail.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:04 am

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:05 am

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:21 am

Here is one from Rich, "Presidio La Bahia" by Granville Bruce.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:25 am

Technically not Texas, but this is neat. It is C.B. Graham's "Church Near Monclova." Rich sent this to me;
he pointed out that this is probably where Ursula's death would be recorded.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:16 am

Theodore Gentilz' "Mexican Oxcart and Jacal." That is one neatly-constructed jacal.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:17 am

Thomas Allen, "Mexican Women Washing at San Pedro Spring," 1879.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:18 am

Detail.

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:18 am

I wish these were in color!

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:19 am

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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby NefariousNed on Thu Jun 07, 2012 6:12 am

K Hale wrote:Technically not Texas, but this is neat. It is C.B. Graham's "Church Near Monclova." Rich sent this to me;
he pointed out that this is probably where Ursula's death would be recorded.

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Wonder if there's any chance this church is still standing?
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Thu Jun 07, 2012 1:36 pm

Nefarious wrote:
K Hale wrote:Technically not Texas, but this is neat. It is C.B. Graham's "Church Near Monclova." Rich sent this to me;
he pointed out that this is probably where Ursula's death would be recorded.

Image

Wonder if there's any chance this church is still standing?

I've Googled for pictures of Monclova in the past, and have never come across this church. Doesn't mean it's not there, of course. Hopefully it is...
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby NefariousNed on Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:16 pm

K Hale wrote:
Nefarious wrote:
K Hale wrote:Technically not Texas, but this is neat. It is C.B. Graham's "Church Near Monclova." Rich sent this to me;
he pointed out that this is probably where Ursula's death would be recorded.

Image

Wonder if there's any chance this church is still standing?

I've Googled for pictures of Monclova in the past, and have never come across this church. Doesn't mean it's not there, of course. Hopefully it is...



Same here. This seems to be the most famous church in Monclova.
(And it sort of resembles the Alamo.)
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby Seguin on Fri Jun 08, 2012 4:57 am

It looks like people had a thing with four pillars in front of churches back then.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby MartyB on Sat Jun 09, 2012 6:32 am

Of interest...

"Old Stone Fort Nacogdoches, Texas, by BLANDING SLOAN (1889-1975)

Etching and aquatint, 8in. x 11in., Signed and dated lower right, titled lower left

Blanding Sloan studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts under B. J. O. Nordfeldt. He divided his time between Los Angeles, and
New york, while designing stage sets. In the 1930s, he was supervisor of arts and crafts at the LaVillita restoration project in San
Antonio.

Provenance: Collection of the Heard Museum, McKinney, Texas
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby MartyB on Sat Jun 09, 2012 2:18 pm

Of interest....

From "SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY, VOL. XCIII, NO. 3, JANUARY, 1990"...
TEXANA & THE AMERICAN BORDERLANDS


Looks like one of my ancestors.........
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby K Hale on Sat Jun 09, 2012 3:09 pm

MartyB wrote:Of interest...

"Old Stone Fort Nacogdoches, Texas, by BLANDING SLOAN (1889-1975)

Etching and aquatint, 8in. x 11in., Signed and dated lower right, titled lower left

Blanding Sloan studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts under B. J. O. Nordfeldt. He divided his time between Los Angeles, and New york, while designing stage sets. In the 1930s, he was supervisor of arts and crafts at the LaVillita restoration project in San Antonio.

Provenance: Collection of the Heard Museum, McKinney, Texas

That looks a lot like one of the buildings at Fort Clark.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby NefariousNed on Sat Jun 09, 2012 8:00 pm

K Hale wrote:
MartyB wrote:Of interest...

"Old Stone Fort Nacogdoches, Texas, by BLANDING SLOAN (1889-1975)

/quote]
That looks a lot like one of the buildings at Fort Clark.

It do, Kristi. (Fort Clark, 1882, by Melvin Warren.)
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Oct 16, 2012 9:44 pm

Which I'd consulted Theodore Gentilz's painting of San Pedro Springs before going there.
It would've helped me to understand what I was looking at, and, in doing so, appreciate
it all the more.

Here's Rich Curilla's recent photo taken from the same angle.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Oct 16, 2012 10:33 pm

And here are Rich's Google Earth Overviews of San Pedro Park and Springs.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby RLC-GTT on Tue Oct 16, 2012 10:58 pm

Thanks, Ned. This was my second visit to the spring. My first was in March -- and it indeed had water flowing and looked more like the Gentilz painting, which is titled "Ojo de Agua San Pedro" (Eye of Water San Pedro). This spring feeds San Pedro Creek which flows (when it does) directly behind the back gate of the Governor's Palace.

Governor Alarcon and Padre Olivares arrived at this spring on April 25, 1718, and founded El Presidio de San Antonio de Bexar at this spot on May 5. Padre Olivares founded the Mission San Antonio de Valero about three-quarters of a league downstream from the spring and on the right bank (west of the creek, in this case). The site of the first mission has not be accurately located but it was near the present location of the privately owned Chapel of the Miracles about 0.8 mile NNW of the Governor's Palace and now nearly under I-10. By the early 1720's, of course, the presidio and mission had been permanently relocated at their present sites. It was this San Pedro Springs however that first appealed to the Alarcon/Olivares expedition.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby RLC-GTT on Tue Oct 16, 2012 11:01 pm

This fascinating connection between great art and real history is what I find most meaningful. Theadore Gentilz moved to San Antonio from France in 1844 and fell in love with what he saw. His paintings are why I can go for long periods without "seeing" all the Ripleys and Hard Rock Cafe's.

This whole *exhibit* would have been a total failure if Ned hadn't come up with a digital copy of the Gentilz painting. Though one of my favorites, I only have it in the book about Gentilz.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby Seguin on Wed Oct 17, 2012 3:46 am

Nefarious wrote:Which I'd consulted Theodore Gentilz's painting of San Pedro Springs before going there.
It would've helped me to understand what I was looking at, and, in doing so, appreciate
it all the more.

Here's Rich Curilla's recent photo taken from the same angle.


It´s amazing it´s the same place. Very nice painting by Gentilz though.

And here are Rich's Google Earth Overviews of San Pedro Park and Springs.


Great looking park, and not small either!
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby Chaska on Sun Nov 18, 2012 12:50 am

Ned and Rich - I put this together a couple of years ago...
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby Chaska on Sun Nov 18, 2012 1:02 am

RLC-GTT wrote:
K Hale wrote:All kinds of activity here! A watermelon cart being unloaded, a slave riding a burro, a dog stealing someone's hat, and what looks like a barrel rolling along on its own wheels.

That is a barrel, Rich. "Aguadores" would sell clean water for drinking and cooking. The acequias were for washing/cleaning water and for watering animals, probably not good for drinking. An aguador didn't need a cart with wheels when he could just roll his barrel. Gentilz or another Texas painter devoted an entire painting to an aguador, and there are photos of them also.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby Chaska on Sun Nov 18, 2012 1:40 am

A few notes on some of the paintings in this thread:

Although the Samuel paintings are dated "1849," they were probably painted much later, (1870s?) as decorations for Samuel's office in the Sheriff's headquarters or elsewhere in the city's courthouse. This might explain some anomalies in attire and architecture. (The SF church has a parapet on it, not built until after 1849.)

The Thomas Allen painting of washerwomen should probably be titled San Pedro Creek, not Springs. The Springs were already a city park when Allen painted, and the shacks are more indicative of dwellings along the creek. Since the creek is fed from the springs, Allen may not have been aware of the distinction.
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Re: Art of Early Texas

Postby NefariousNed on Fri Nov 23, 2012 5:10 pm

Thanks, Craig. Great photo comparison and information. I wonder how I missed this when you posted it?
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Re: Art Of Early Texas

Postby MartyB on Sun Apr 27, 2014 5:13 am

Of interest...

Coin Art

Trade or Merchant coin for Albert's Saloon, San Antonio, Texas, struck in aluminum ca. 1889.

Nice image of the Alamo Church facade...
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Re: Art Of Early Texas

Postby MartyB on Mon Apr 28, 2014 1:58 am

More Coin Art...

This merchant token is good for a 15 cent drink at the White Elephant in San Antonio, Texas, circa 1880's...

A classic Texas pictorial rarity. The elephant image was a popular motif on 1880's American tokens due to the Ringling Brothers Circus star "Jumbo" who traveled the U.S. on a publicity tour.
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Re: Art Of Early Texas

Postby HunterMike on Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:33 pm

MartyB wrote:Of interest...

Coin Art

Trade or Merchant coin for Albert's Saloon, San Antonio, Texas, struck in aluminum ca. 1889.

Nice image of the Alamo Church facade...


I believe that's Albert Friedrich from Albert's Buckhorn Saloon. Unless I'm mistaken that would be today's Buckhorn Saloon. Cool coin, Marty.
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Re: Art Of Early Texas

Postby MartyB on Tue Apr 29, 2014 5:20 am

HunterMike wrote:
MartyB wrote:Of interest...

Coin Art

Trade or Merchant coin for Albert's Saloon, San Antonio, Texas, struck in aluminum ca. 1889.

Nice image of the Alamo Church facade...


I believe that's Albert Friedrich from Albert's Buckhorn Saloon. Unless I'm mistaken that would be today's Buckhorn Saloon. Cool coin, Marty.


You may find this of interest...



POST 1 of 2
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Re: Art Of Early Texas

Postby MartyB on Tue Apr 29, 2014 5:21 am

Buckhorn Saloon...continued




POST 2 of 2
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