GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

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GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Fri May 02, 2014 12:42 am

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Always loved the original 1956 US-released version with Raymond Burr. Equally appreciate the original 1954 Japanese version, GOJIRA.

In the 60's Godzilla got goofy and cuddly, pitting the nuclear dinosaur against other Japanese monsters of the day, as well as King Kong.
There was even a baby Godzilla (which Larry "Seymour" Vincent made much sport of on his "Fright Night" movie presentation.) GODZILLA
2000 was supposed to be an update of the 1956 version and even had a cameo by Raymond Burr, but it was still not as effective as the
original done over 40 years before. The 1998 version with Matthew Broderick was not as bad as some people continue to remember it.
It featured the destruction of New York with many famous landmarks going down to this giant mutant Iguana. Two years later, the Twin
Towers would fall, and, all of a sudden, the idea of a fantasy monster destroying New York became a reality. Thanks to the reality of the
times, this particular Godzilla did not hold up so well. He remains a Godzilla people would rather forget.

On May 16, a new GODZILLA will be hitting the theaters. (And once again destroying New York.) I wonder if Americans, New Yorkers, in
particular, will be receptive to this new threat to their homeland and surroundings?
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Fri May 02, 2014 12:47 am

Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Posted: 05/01/2014 12:31 pm EDT Updated: 05/01/2014 12:59 pm EDT
This article was co-written with Geoffrey Wilson, Research Assistant at Ploughshares Fund

He's back. But there is more to this bad-boy lizard than you realize.

Godzilla is coming to a screen near you on May 16, Hollywood's latest action-packed thrill ride.
But will it keep faith with the original Godzilla -- one of the world's first anti-nuclear movies?

Despite dozens of sequels and reboots that got sillier with each iteration, the first "King of the
Monsters" was a somber and serious affair. And with good reason.

After the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the occupying U.S. forces forbade
the Japanese from writing anything about atomic weapons, with U.S. censors blocking them
until 1952. Even then, not much was written.

But on March 1, 1954, the United States exploded the world's first hydrogen bomb. With energy
produced through the fusion of atoms rather then their splitting, the "Castle Bravo" test
detonated with the force of 15 million tons of TNT -- 1,000 times more powerful than either of
the bombs dropped on Japan. To this day, it remains the largest nuclear weapon ever detonated
by the United States.

Castle Bravo's explosive power surprised even its designers, who had estimated its yield at only
6 million tons. Their miscalculation cost lives, as radiation and nuclear fallout spread far beyond
the expected radius.

The Japanese fishing boat Lucky Dragon #5 was well outside the danger zone that the U.S. had
declared before the test. A flash as bright as the sun temporarily blinded the crew, followed by the
roar of the explosion a full eight minutes later. Though they had turned to run, the damage was
already done.

Lucky Dragon #5 returned home to Japan with all her hands suffering from acute radiation syndrome,
including headaches, burns, bleeding from the gums and other symptoms. Six months later on
September 23, Lucky Dragon #5's radioman became the first person to die from an H-bomb.

The test was the catalyst for Godzilla. Toho Studios decided to make a movie that reflected the
anger and fear of the Japanese people about nuclear weapons, picking director Ishiro Honda, who
had walked through the burned ruins of Hiroshima as a soldier, to helm the picture.

Toho and Honda created a monster, one wakened by nuclear detonations, who was completely
impervious to all of man's conventional defenses. Godzilla could breath atomic fire. He emerged
from Tokyo Bay as a force of nature, leaving nothing in his wake but nuclear ash and the ruins of a
once mighty city. Characters throughout the film make reference to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki
bombings, and Godzilla's very skin was designed to look like the keloid scars seen on survivors of
those nuclear holocausts.

When the movie opened, just a little over a month after the death of the Lucky Dragon's radioman,
audiences were greeted by an opening scene in which a fishing boat, designated as "#5," witnesses a
blinding flash of light before going down, with the ship's radio operator the first to die.

Audiences watched in silence. Here was a searing depiction of the consequences of nuclear war.
Steeped in allegory, yes, but not just a tale of fiction. The monster, like nuclear weapons, was
uncaring, unsympathetic and once his terror was unleashed, all but impossible to stop. Godzilla
turned Tokyo to cinders, and brushed aside all military conceits. Even when he returned to the sea,
Godzilla left behind the creeping killer of radiation and nuclear fallout.

The movie ends with the heroes besting Godzilla, but only by deploying a weapon as equally terrifying
as the monster. Dubbed the "Oxygen Destroyer," the weapon was so dangerous, that after the
destruction of Godzilla, its creator nobly takes his own life so that a second one could never be built.
Even with the monster defeated, the heroes warn that if nations continue to test nuclear weapons,
it may not be long before another Godzilla is loosed upon the world.

All nations save North Korea have now stopped testing nuclear weapons. But some want to restart,
and the United States has never ratified the nuclear test ban treaty. Under Secretary for Arms Control
and International Security Rose Gottemoeller went to the Marshall Islands this year on the anniversary
of the Castle Bravo test, in part, to push for a full, global ban. She declared, "this is not just a security
issue; this is an issue of humanity, of health, of morality."

Keep that in mind when you spill your popcorn at the theater when Godzilla 2014 roars. Today, we love
him for the thrills, but for Japanese moviegoers, who 60 years ago waited in ticket lines for hours,
Godzilla was something much more powerful, much more evocative.

He was a reminder of the terrifying destructive power of nuclear weapons. A reminder that the good and
the bad, the innocent and the guilty, the pacifist and the warmonger, are all threatened by the most
destructive weapons ever created. In a world that now has blissfully forgotten these nuclear nightmares,
Godzilla can still serve as a potent reminder.

"We are the stewards of this Earth," Gottemoeller said, "and we owe it to those who have fallen -- to
those who suffer still -- to work together, one step at a time, until nuclear explosive testing is banned
worldwide, getting us one step closer to our goal of the peace and security of a world without nuclear
weapons."

You go, Godzilla.

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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Fri May 02, 2014 6:40 pm

Any Godzilla fans out there?
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby nybob on Sun May 04, 2014 4:47 am

I like Godzilla and i hope the movie stays faithful to the original. I do have to say i have a soft spot in my heart for Rodan. That was one of the first movies my dad took me and my brother to see. I covered my eyes through most of the movie. My brother and i still get a laugh about that today. Bob
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Sun May 04, 2014 7:04 pm

What about, Gamera, the atomic flying turtle, Bob?
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby TexianAtHeartII on Mon May 05, 2014 2:18 am

nybob wrote:I like Godzilla and i hope the movie stays faithful to the original. I do have to say i have a soft spot in my heart for Rodan. That was one of the first movies my dad took me and my brother to see. I covered my eyes through most of the movie. My brother and i still get a laugh about that today. Bob


Bob, Rodan was the first Japanese monster movie I ever saw. My parents took me and my brother to see it when it came out way back when. And my kids all liked the later made Godzilla movies and the other monster movies that were similar. My oldest son told me last night that from what he understands, the world is being terrorized by these other monsters, called Kaiju, or something like that. And that there is a secret place where Godzilla is being kept and the world powers decided to release him to kill the other monsters, but that things get out of hand, as they usually do in Godzilla movies.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby nybob on Wed May 07, 2014 12:27 am

NefariousNed wrote:What about, Gamera, the atomic flying turtle, Bob?



No Gamera for me! Rodan is the man! Or reptile for me. " The heat, the gases, the fumes, as keyio weeped on my shoulder i realized the Rodan's were doomed. " My brother still throws that line at me. Bob
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby bustedluck on Wed May 07, 2014 1:47 pm

A friend of mine calls the US government Fedzilla.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby MartyB on Wed May 07, 2014 2:21 pm

NefariousNed wrote:Any Godzilla fans out there?


I never really cared one way or the other about the original 'Godzilla'...

Until....Many years ago my father-in-law (he was a shrimper)and I worked all day on his boat while it was in the shipyard...and it was
hot...I mean Mississippi hot...We went to his house and had some very cold, very refreshing beers...'Godzilla' came on the TV and we l
aughed ourselves silly the whole time it was on...Raymond Burr's wooden, plug in scenes were an absolute riot!!!!

When the later versions were shown on TV the kids loved them and when the newer versions came out I watched them with the kids
(who loved all versions of' Godzilla')...

Needless to say, because of the kids enjoying the franchise so much and that memorable drinking session with my father-in-law.........
I have a great affection of 'Godzilla'...........
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby alamonorth on Wed May 07, 2014 9:32 pm

Not sure if this is the right place but its close enough. Just got a great dvd from Amazon at a really good price. Its called Sci-Fi Creature Classics: 4 Movie Collection. And since we are talking about Godzilla and Rodan this collection has another of Godzilla's relatives ; Mothra. The other three films include two of the best monster films of the fifties, 20 Million Miles to Earth and It Came From Beneath the Sea ;and the absolute worst, most ludicrous giant monster movie The Giant Claw. The real joke is , is that I bought the dvd for The Giant Claw because that was one of the prehistoric monster films that I didn't have.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby Alamo_Stu on Wed May 07, 2014 10:03 pm

Oh, and then Cloverfield filmed in real-time camera work. I never seen it though. Godzilla rules! :ugeek:
Last edited by Alamo_Stu on Thu May 08, 2014 11:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby MartyB on Thu May 08, 2014 3:04 pm

:D ...
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Thu May 08, 2014 3:28 pm

I remember that first view of Godzilla poking his head over the ridge scared the willies out of me as a kid.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby MartyB on Thu May 08, 2014 3:43 pm

NefariousNed wrote:I remember that first view of Godzilla poking his head over the ridge scared the willies out of me as a kid.


Absolutely.....



Wasn't it great!!!!!
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby Alamo_Stu on Sat May 10, 2014 3:48 pm

Godzilla swallows FIAT.
Car commercial for FIAT per Godzilla.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOcAv5jEEyY
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby Pudman on Sat May 10, 2014 4:30 pm

Also a big fan of Godzilla and friends. Saw many of them as Saturday afternoon features in the 60's. I saw in Walmart this week double feature Godzilla Blu-Rays though are fairly recent. $12.95.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Mon May 12, 2014 8:49 pm


http://youtu.be/64c6VLNJQiE
Here the teaser trailer. "Godzilla" opens this Friday, May 16.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby RLC-GTT on Mon May 12, 2014 11:15 pm

Ooooo! They truly don't want us to sleep at night -- or go into the next generation, for that matter. :ugeek:
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby MartyB on Tue May 13, 2014 1:15 pm

:D ...
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Thu May 15, 2014 6:25 am

Post-Fukushima, Japan's favorite monster may never go home again
Reuters
By By Elaine Lies 22 hours ago

TOKYO (Reuters) - He's dark and lumbering, crashing through cities and destroying them with swipes of his
massive tail and blasts of radioactive breath. Godzilla is back on the rampage, roaring and stomping, for
the first time in ten years.

But the much-anticipated return of Japan's most famous and beloved monster, 60 years and 28 movies after
he first rose from the depths following a hydrogen bomb test, has been filmed not in the land of his birth
but in the United States - and analysts say there is a chance he may never go back to his homeland.

For in the wake of the world's worst nuclear crisis in 25 years, when a tsunami tore through the Fukushima
Daiichi nuclear plant and touched off meltdowns that spewed radiation over a wide swathe of countryside,
Godzilla and his traditional anti-nuclear subtext may simply be too touchy a subject for any Japanese film
maker to handle.

"Godzilla gains his strength from nuclear power and he spews radiation everywhere," said Toshio Takahashi,
a literature professor at Tokyo's Waseda University. "If Godzilla appeared (in Japan) now, he'd ultimately
force people to ask themselves hard questions about Fukushima."

The nuclear disaster at the plant 220 km (130 miles) northeast of Tokyo is a sensitive subject in Japan.
Directors making mass-market films about Fukushima tiptoe into the debate or set their movies in an
unspecified future. Sponsors are skittish and overall film revenues falling, with viewers shying away from
anything too political.

Things were different when Godzilla first crashed ashore in 1954, a symbol of both atomic weapons - less
than a decade after Hiroshima and Nagasaki - and frustrations with the United States, which had just held
a hydrogen bomb test at Bikini atoll that irradiated a boat full of Japanese fishermen.

The high-powered reboot of Godzilla, directed by Gareth Edwards and out in U.S. theaters from Friday from
Warner Bros Pictures and Legendary Pictures, features stars including Juliette Binoche and Ken Watanabe.

It gives a nod to Fukushima with a tsunami - set off by monsters - hitting Hawaii, and a no-go zone in Japan
after a nuclear accident years before. But much of the story, and most of the destruction, takes place in the
United States, far from Godzilla's birthplace.

"GODZILLA EQUALS RADIATION"

Japan's March 11, 2011, natural and nuclear disaster killed nearly 20,000 people and forced some 160,000
people to evacuate, with tens of thousands unable to return. The plant still battles radioactive water and
decommissioning is expected to take decades and cost billions of dollars.

"You can basically think of Godzilla equal ling radiation. It's something that can't be solved by human strength
or power, and it attacks," said film critic Yuichi Maeda.

"The reactors currently can't be made normal by humans if there's an accident. It's the same with Godzilla."

Sixty years ago, the black-and-white version of the towering, dinosaur-like creature - his name combines
"gorilla" and the Japanese word for whale - packed viewers into theaters.

"That year was also when Japan was starting to debate the peaceful use of nuclear energy," said Takahashi.
"So the movie expressed fears about nuclear power as well as weapons."

The nuclear theme was a constant through the Cold War, although Godzilla, who remained a man in a rubber
suit stomping through model cities - a touch that humanized him to many - gradually lost his edge and took on
a more cuddly tone.

His radioactive connections were blurred in the last few films before film company Toho ended the series,
Takahashi noted, perhaps because of a series of accidents at Japanese nuclear facilities around then, including
a 1999 criticality accident set off by workers mixing compounds that killed two.

A U.S. version of Godzilla in 1998 was widely panned. Early reviews of the new film are mixed, with many in
Japan saying the monster looks "fat". It opens in Japan in late July, timed to hit school summer holidays.

A Toho spokesman said the company abandoned the franchise in 2004 on its 50th anniversary because the timing
was right, and that no decision has been made about future revivals in Japan.

"The current movie has a message that is a warning from nature about things mankind has done," he said. "We
have to see how people respond, including those who experienced Fukushima."

Takahashi says that Godzilla's longevity shows there is something far deeper at work than the usual monster movie.

"Godzilla shows us that we must return to our dark past and then accept it," he said. "His purpose is to make us
question ourselves. So I think we need to still walk with him a little more, especially after Fukushima."

(Reporting by Elaine Lies; Editing by William Mallard and Nick Macfie)
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Thu May 15, 2014 7:15 pm

Will be doing a "Godzilla" double feature at the Alamo Drafthouse this evening. "Gojira", the original 1954 Japanese version,
16 minutes longer than the 1956 rerelease of "Godzilla, King Of The Monstors" with Raymond Burr, followed by the 2014 version.
That's a lot of popcorn to be consumed.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Fri May 16, 2014 6:40 am

Back from the Godzilla double feature. They had arranged it so that if you were going to see the 1954 version, you could just stay in the same theater to watch
the 2014 version. The original "Gojira" was a cautionary tale about the dangers and consequences of nuclear testing. The 2014 one takes that premise and then
runs with it. Most of the film deals with nuclear reactor accidents, as well as bomb tests. It starts off in Japan, then takes the viewer to the Philippines, Hawaii,
Oakland, San Francisco and Nevada. Seems there are creatures that feed upon nuclear waste and so travel towards wherever they can get it. There are several
monsters involved in the story, Godzilla being merely one of them. The others look sort of like reptilian flying mantis with thin dagger-tipped legs rather than
feet. The Godzilla monster looks like a rather bloated version of his old familiar self. It seems his total purpose in the film is to fight the other creatures, not
destroy all cities points east. This film element conjures up images of the old Godzilla vs Monster (fill in the blank) Japanese movies. Seems like Godzilla
and the other monsters are all in a race to the closest stash of nuclear material. Along the path of destruction are scenes reminiscent of recent nuclear reactor
disasters, tsunamis and 911-style major city damage. I think they just decided to call the movie "Godzilla" because of the name's drawing power. Godzilla himself
appears in barely 15 minutes of the 2 hour and 3 minute film. One of the Japanese characters is carried over from the original film, Dr. Serizawa (Ken Watanabe)
but he doesn't get as much screen time as he deserves. No sense in going much further into the plot for the sake of those who intend to see the film. Again, they
could've easily given the film a different title because it has little to do with Godzilla at all. As much as the 1998 version with Matthew Broderick was panned, it
is light years ahead of this one as far as plot and entertainment value go.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby Seguin on Fri May 16, 2014 7:05 am

Godzilla gets 15 min. of screen time in a 2-hour movie called "Godzilla"? That sounds a bit disappointing.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Fri May 16, 2014 6:55 pm

Seguin wrote:Godzilla gets 15 min. of screen time in a 2-hour movie called "Godzilla"? That sounds a bit disappointing.

There were 12 people in the theater to see the original "Gojira". The house was packed for the remake. The film made Nine Million
Dollars in just this Thursday sneak peek. Looks like it's going to be a winner. Hello sequel.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby Seguin on Sat May 17, 2014 3:28 am

NefariousNed wrote:
Seguin wrote:Godzilla gets 15 min. of screen time in a 2-hour movie called "Godzilla"? That sounds a bit disappointing.

There were 12 people in the theater to see the original "Gojira". The house was packed for the remake. The film made Nine Million
Dollars in just this Thursday sneak peek. Looks like it's going to be a winner. Hello sequel.


I wonder if that´s due to the hype or because it´s an exciting movie after all despite you only see Godzilla for 15 min.? The hype alone is enough to get people to flock to the theaters...in the beginning till people start telling their friends to not go see it. I guess we´ll have to wait and see what happens. Do the critics love it?
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Sun May 18, 2014 11:22 pm

Japanese Warm Up to Idea of American ‘Godzilla’
Variety
By Mark Schilling 10 hours ago

The Internet rumor that the Japanese see the new made-in-America “Godzilla” as “super-sized”
and “too fat” is all wrong, Toho would like you to know.

“It’s just a small number of people saying that,” explains Toho PR rep Yosuke Ogura. “The
number of people here who are OK with the new ‘Godzilla’ is a lot larger.”

Toho is the Japanese distributor of the film, and owns the underlying Godzilla property.

He favorably compares the look of the title monster in the Gareth Edwards pic to that in the
1998 Roland Emmerich “Godzilla,” which he frankly labels a “disaster.”

“This new Godzilla is closer in spirit to the original,” he says. “If you just see the trailer, you
might get the idea that he’s ‘fat’ or whatever, but once you see the whole film, as I have, I
think your opinion will change.”

Local fan opinion is more diverse than earlier negative media reports implied.

A glance at recent comments on the popular 2channel message board site reveals more
anticipation than snark, now that additional info about the film has appeared, including early
reviews.

“Gareth Edwards has made a full-bore, completely new ‘Godzilla’ that will be accepted around
the world,” opines one poster. “I think it will be an immortal masterpiece.”

Fat jokes are nowhere in sight.

Japan, however, will be the last major market to view the latest Hollywood iteration of the iconic
franchise that Toho launched in 1954 with the first of 28 made-in-Japan Godzilla pics: The studio
plans to release “Godzilla” on July 25, nearly six weeks after its U.S. bow, but not out of any
uncertainty about its success.

“That’s just the best timing,” explains Ogura. “It’s when big movies are released here.”

One recent example is the Hayao Miyazaki animation “The Wind Rises,” a Toho release that
opened on July 20, 2013, and became the year’s highest-earning pic with $117 million.

One reason for this timing is that Japanese schools do not begin their summer break until mid-
July. But Toho, Ogura emphasizes, does not consider “Godzilla” kiddie fare. “Of course, children
will be able to see it – it’s rated for all ages,” he says, “but our primary target is adults.”

Toho is still sorting out its release strategy, though Ogura says the number of screens “will be as
large as we can make it.”

One measure of comparison is the 454 screens Toho secured for “The Wind Rises.” “It will be in
that range,” Ogura says.

Toho has not yet announced a B.O. target, but given the film’s $93 million weekend opening in the
U.S., Toho can probably look forward to strong returns.

Its own risk is relatively limited, however, since it is not a production partner on “Godzilla,” a co-
production of Legendary Pictures and Warner Bros. Pictures.

As part of its celebrations for the 60th anniversary of the original “Godzilla”’s debut, Toho plans
to release a digitally re-mastered version of the 1954 Ishiro Honda classic on June 7 at theaters
nationwide.

Meanwhile, since March, Nihon Eiga Satellite Broadcasting, a Japanese movie specialty channel,
has been broadcasting all 28 Toho-produced Godzilla pics as a lead-up to the July Japan release of
“Godzilla,” including a 24-hour all-Godzilla lineup on May 5, during the Golden Week holiday. Also
on the channel’s line-up are the 1998 Emmerich pic and “Godzilla, King of the Monsters,” the
1956 reworking of the original film for the U.S. market starring Raymond Burr.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby nybob on Mon May 19, 2014 12:07 am

I just saw the film today. While i might be in the minority i enjoyed the film. True Godzilla is not on screen that long however, i thought the story was interesting and held my interest. The special effects were good. The acting not as bad as i thought it would be. I gave it three stars even with a four year old in the next row crying on and off. Now if they can only remake Rodan i will be happy. Bob
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Wed May 21, 2014 6:30 am

Again, one of the things I was disappointed in was that Godzilla was not the star of the show. He was certainly an important supporting player, but not the "star".
That illustrious title went to some of the human actors. All in all, "Godzilla (2014) feels more like a sequel, than an introduction to the character. And the way
Godzilla is introduced is sort of an anti-climatic let-down. Instead of the people who are about to be attacked by him being totally surprised by his sudden presence,
the creature is instead being monitored all along the way of his approach to his intended target.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Thu Oct 13, 2016 6:32 am

ShinGodzilla2016.png
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Back from the Alamo Drafthouse screening of "Shin Godzilla". ("Shin" meaning "real", so it is explained.) Made by Japan's Toho pictures, the folks who brought us the original "Godzilla" in 1954, this has a limited US run of just a week. (Today is the 2nd day.) Subtitled in English, this version may be hard for some to follow, but it at least captures the true feeling the producers were going for, instead of the horrible, stilted, out-of-sync dubbing we've had to deal with over the years.

The movie stays true to the original in that it is not so much the story of a monster running rampant through the streets as it is the story of a city, then a country coming to terms with its past mistakes and then facing up to those past mistakes by trying to find a way to stop the problem before it spreads. It also shows how trying to get something done on this level requires going through a lot of red tape and jumping through a lot of government hoops. This branch of government does not agree with another branch, which in turn does not agree with another. Instead of working together to solve the problem, they are each looking after their own best interests. One branch of government, for instance, actually decides by process of elimination which section of Tokyo should be defended and which should be left to fall. It is, of course, the most influential section that ultimately gets first defense because it creates the most revenue flow and has the most registered voters!

All this bickering and infighting only results in nothing being done, allowing Godzilla to become more of a national threat than a local one. The U.S. and the U.N. are then called upon to help stop the problem, but with each having their own way of approaching the situation, and each grappling for power, in the end, it is private industry that steps up to the plate with the most hopeful solution. But will the governments let loose their control by allowing the private sector to take control? It's a real pickle.

The American connection to the film is a Japanese-American physicist who comes to Tokyo at the request of her father. While the film is all sub-titled, at times when she speaks, she does so in English.

The Godzilla monster does not disappoint. The indestructible creature, born of nuclear mismanagement, leaves a wake of destruction as it works its way through Tokyo. I must admit that, seeing all those buildings crashing down in clouds of smoke and debris hearkened back to the real tragedy of 9/11, giving it an even more unsettling feel. And this Godzilla/Gojira also has its powers kicked up a few notches from its 1954 predecessor. (Watch out for that tail!)

One thing that "Shin Godzilla" seems to lack is the necessary love interest and the sense of personal sacrifice. These two elements were crucial to the original and made it a slightly better film I think. Of course I also think that any film that tugs at the heartstrings rates rather higher with me, personally.

Released in only 440 theaters nationwide for just the week-long run, I suppose that "Shin Godzilla" will have most of its true Godzilla fans in attendance. Not an action film to hold the kiddies interest (Godzilla is only on the screen for 22 minutes of the some 2 hour long film) I couldn't see the film being a big success here. But I'm still glad that I was able to see it.

It is also well to note that "Shin Godzilla" is also more of a reboot, than a remake. The spirit of Godzilla is there; same company producing it, but with a new origin story. An added bonus and connection to the 1954 film is it's theme song and portions of the soundtrack.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Wed Aug 09, 2017 7:42 pm

Haruo Nakajima, the man in the Godzilla suit in "Gojira" (1954) and "Godzilla" (1956) has passed away at 88.
Nakajima played Godzilla/Gojira in several films, beginning in 1954 with Godzilla and continuing until 1972’s
"Godzilla vs. Gigan". He also made appearances in "The Hidden Fortress" and "Seven Samurai".
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby TexianAtHeartII on Thu Aug 10, 2017 12:45 am

Shin Godzilla was released on video this week. I might have to get a copy, since I always enjoyed the original one. Weren't there two versions back then? The version for Japanese viewers and the one with Raymond Burr, for American viewers?
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby Pudman on Sun Aug 13, 2017 8:16 pm

The Japanese version is the way to go, if you do not mind reading sub-titles.
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Re: GODZILLA: King Of The Monstors

Postby NefariousNed on Sun Aug 13, 2017 11:43 pm

Pudman wrote:The Japanese version is the way to go, if you do not mind reading sub-titles.

The box set for "Gojira" contains both versions.
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