The Changing Face Of Disney

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Re: The Changing Face Of Disney

Postby TexianAtHeartII on Tue Aug 29, 2017 12:33 am

NefariousNed wrote:Victoria came across this. Johnny Depp as Jack Sparrow, visits the British Columbia Children's Hospital.



I've read a few times over the last few years that he does this. Great gesture.
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Re: The Changing Face Of Disney

Postby Sharkman on Tue Aug 29, 2017 1:27 am

Sharkman wrote:His farm up here just outside of Lexington is comming up for auction Sept 15 I think.
It's listed on Willow for a marked down 2.9 million. Anyone want to go halfs on it ? :lol:


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Re: The Changing Face Of Disney

Postby Sharkman on Tue Aug 29, 2017 1:29 am

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Re: The Changing Face Of Disney

Postby Seguin on Sun Sep 03, 2017 11:00 am

The sign says Betsy Sue´s Family Farm.
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Re: The Changing Face Of Disney

Postby Sharkman on Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:42 pm

His Mother lived there ! It's explained in the ad on Willow :D
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Re: The Changing Face Of Disney

Postby Seguin on Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:39 am

Tyrus Wong, The ‘Bambi’ Artist Who Endured America’s Racism, Gets His Due

The late Tyrus Wong, whose paintings formed the basis of Disney’s iconic film, is finally receiving the recognition he deserves.

By Katherine Brooks. 09/06/2017 09:01 am ET Updated 6 hours ago.

Even if you’ve never heard the name Tyrus Wong before, you’ve likely seen his work. Maybe not in a museum or gallery, but you’ve probably enjoyed the late artist’s fascinating brushstrokes ― or the films that they inspired ― in the comforts of your home.

Until his death last year at the age of 106, Wong was considered America’s oldest living Chinese-American artist and one of the last remaining icons of Disney’s golden age of animation. Few people outside of his studio could identify him during his lifetime, but his art was eerily ubiquitous. Handpicked by Walt Disney to guide one of his films, Wong’s watercolor sketches formed the basis of “Bambi” and, later, Warner Bros.′ live-action movies like “Rebel without a Cause.” His calligraphic imagery wound its way onto Hallmark Christmas cards, kites and hand-painted California dinnerware. He did show in galleries and museums, too ― with greats like Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, no less.

And yet, it wasn’t until recently ― later in his life ― that he began receiving the recognition he deserved. It was in 1942 when he painted a minuscule buck leaping through a forest felled by blazing flames, an electric landscape that would heavily influence the World War II-era movie about a fawn who lost his mother. Seventy-five years after “Bambi,” Wong is the subject of an “American Masters” film on PBS, a documentary portrait that reveals how he overcame a harrowing immigration process and years of racism in the United States to become one of the most prolific artists in recent memory.

“Tyrus Wong’s story is a prime example of one of the many gaping holes in our society’s narrative on art, cinema, and Western history,” Pamela Tom, the director behind “Tyrus,” set to air on PBS Sept. 8, explained in a statement. “By telling his story, I wanted to shine light on one of America’s unsung heroes, and raise awareness of the vital contributions he’s made to American culture.”

Her 90-minute documentary follows Wong from his birth in Canton (now Guangzhou), China, to his attempts to immigrate to the United States in 1919. Detained for a month, he, along with his father, endured extensive interrogation before being allowed to enter the country, only to live in poverty once they arrived. As multiple sources in the film point out, American society in the 1920s and ’30s was not kind to Chinese-American communities ― many immigrants saw only a few options for work, including acting as laundry men, house boys or restaurant staff. And the world of animation and film, a more than unlikely field Wong fought tooth and nail to enter, was not much kinder. Described as “an old boy’s club,” Wong recounts how he was called a racial slur on his first day with Republic Pictures.

Still, his sights were ultimately set on fine art. An eventual graduate of Otis Art Institute, the animator, designer, painter and kite maker rose to the coveted status of a Disney Legend by 2001. Beyond that, his work indeed hangs in museums, his name appearing in placards next to other greats. “He had a lot of dignity, but he also felt the pangs of racism,” Tom told HuffPost in an earlier interview. “I think Tyrus represents success. He represents someone who’s a survivor, who broke these racial barriers.”

Today, immigrants in the U.S. continue to face astounding obstacles. Just a few days before the premiere of “Tyrus,” President Donald Trump and his administration initiated the termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals protections, putting nearly 800,000 young undocumented immigrants at risk of deportation if members of Congress fail to strike a deal. Wong’s story illuminates just how difficult it is to succeed in a world that’s designed to test your limits at every turn.

“It’s so unlikely,” a voice in the film’s trailer declares of Wong’s biography, “and that’s what makes it so valuable.”

Ahead of the debut of “Tyrus,” HuffPost is premiering an exclusive clip from the “American Masters” film. For more information on the project, head to PBS.


“Tyrus” will air on PBS on Sept. 8 at 9 p.m ET. See more images of Wong’s artwork below.

- Photos of Tyrus Wong and images of his artwork, Bambi and otherwise, is in the article:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tyr ... 4e440dd2bc

Artwork gallery:

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters ... mark/9200/

One more article on Tyrus Wong:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tyr ... 3a08f9c22e
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Re: The Changing Face Of Disney

Postby NefariousNed on Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:09 pm

And here's yet another one gone!

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Legendary Disney Animator and Imagineer Francis Xavier “X” Atencio
Passes Away at Age 98

September 11, 2017
D23 The Official Disney Fan Club

Disney Legend Xavier “X” Atencio, a former Imagineer and Disney animator, passed away on September 10
at the age of 98. X was responsible for helping bring to life a number of beloved Disney parks attractions
including Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion, as well as such animated classics as Pinocchio
and Fantasia.

Born on September 4, 1919, in Walsenburg, Colorado, X—whose friends shortened his name from Francis
Xavier to simply “X”—moved to Los Angeles in 1937 to attend the Chouinard Art Institute. X thought a job
at Disney was out of his reach, but the then-18-year-old artist’s instructors prodded him to submit his
portfolio. In 1938, when he got the good news from Disney, X ran from the original Hyperion Avenue studio
to his aunt’s house shouting, “I got a job at Disney! I got a job at Disney!”

X first saw his work on screen at the 1940 premiere of Pinocchio, and as he watched, he was incredibly
moved by seeing the audience’s reaction. That year, he was promoted to assistant animator for Fantasia
but left temporarily to join the Army Air Corps in the war effort.

Upon his return in 1945, he picked up where he left off, returning to the studio and working for the next
eight years on animated short subjects. His first on-screen credit was for Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom
in 1953, an Oscar®-winning film that took audiences through the history of music. Other films X contributed
to during this time included Noah’s Ark (1959) and A Symposium on Popular Songs (1962), both Academy
Award® nominees, as well as Jack and Old Mac (1956). He worked on the “I’m No Fool” series for the
original Mickey Mouse Club, and in the 1960s, X provided memorable stop-motion sequences for Disney
feature films The Parent Trap (1961), Babes in Toyland (1961), and Mary Poppins (1964).

At the request of Walt Disney, X transferred to WED Enterprises (later Walt Disney Imagineering) in 1965
to work on the Primeval World diorama for Disneyland. At first, X was unsure of the move to WED: “I went
over there reluctantly because I didn’t know what I was getting into, and nobody there knew what I was
supposed to do either,” he recalled. “About a month later I got a phone call from Walt. He told me ‘I want
you to do the script for the Pirates of the Caribbean.’” From that point on, X cemented his legacy at WED
, playing a key role in the development of music and dialogue for the attraction, including co-writing the
iconic song, “Yo Ho (A Pirate’s Life for Me).” For the Haunted Mansion, he wrote the attraction’s dialogue
and co-wrote the song “Grim Grinning Ghosts.” For Walt Disney World, he contributed to If You Had Wings
and Space Mountain at the Magic Kingdom, as well as Spaceship Earth, World of Motion, and the Mexico
pavilion at Epcot. Throughout his career, X always said that his reward, as it was in the days of Pinocchio,
“is still the audience’s reactions.”

“X was an enormous talent who helped define so many of our best experiences around the world,” said Bob
Weis, president of Walt Disney Imagineering. “Some may not know that when he wrote the lyrics for ‘Yo Ho’
he had never actually written a song before. He simply proposed the idea of a tune for Pirates of the Caribbean,
and Walt told him to go and do it. That was how X worked—with an enthusiastic, collaborative attitude, along
with a great sense of humor. His brilliant work continues to inspire Imagineers and bring joy to millions of
guests every year.”

X retired from Disney in 1984, but continued working as a consultant to Walt Disney Imagineering for many
years, and was inducted as a Disney Legend in 1996. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; his children Tori
McCullough, Judianne, and Joe; his stepchildren Brian Sheedy, Kevin Sheedy, and Eileen Haubeil; sons-in-law
Mike McCullough and Chris Haubeil; daughters-in-law Kathy Atencio, Trish Sheedy, and Beth Sheedy; and
nine grandchildren.
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Re: The Changing Face Of Disney

Postby Seguin on Sat Sep 16, 2017 6:54 am

It reminds me of Disney´s nine old men, as they´re called.

"Disney's Nine Old Men were The Walt Disney Company's core animators, some of whom later became directors, who created some of Disney's most famous animated cartoons, from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs onward to The Rescuers, and were referred to as such by Walt Disney himself. All members of the group are now deceased. John Lounsbery was the first to die, in 1976 from heart failure, and the last survivor was Ollie Johnston, who died in 2008 from natural causes. All have been acknowledged as Disney Legends."

Les Clark (November 17, 1907 – September 12, 1979), who joined Disney in 1927. His specialty was animating Mickey Mouse as he was the only one of the Nine Old Men to work on that character from its origins with Ub Iwerks. Les did many scenes throughout the years, animating up until Lady and the Tramp. He moved into directing and made many animated featurettes and shorts.

Marc Davis (March 30, 1913 – January 12, 2000) started in 1935 on Snow White, and later he went on to develop/animate the characters of Bambi and Thumper (in Bambi), Maleficent, Aurora and the raven (in Sleeping Beauty), and Cruella de Vil (in One Hundred and One Dalmatians). Davis was responsible for character design for both the Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion attractions at Disneyland.

Ollie Johnston (October 31, 1912 – April 14, 2008), who joined Disney in 1935, first worked on Snow White. He went on to author the animator's bible The Illusion of Life with Frank Thomas. His work includes Mr. Smee (in Peter Pan), the Stepsisters (in Cinderella), the District Attorney (in The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad), and Prince John (in Robin Hood). According to the book The Disney Villain, written by Johnston and Frank Thomas, Johnston also partnered with Thomas on creating characters such as Ichabod Crane (in The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad) and Sir Hiss (in Robin Hood).

Milt Kahl (March 22, 1909 – April 19, 1987) started in 1934 working on Snow White. His work included heroes such as Pinocchio (in Pinocchio), Tigger (in The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh), Peter Pan (in Peter Pan), and Slue-Foot Sue (in Melody Time) and villains such as Shere Khan (in The Jungle Book), Edgar the butler (in The Aristocats), the Sheriff of Nottingham (in Robin Hood), and Madame Medusa (in The Rescuers).

Ward Kimball (March 4, 1914 – July 8, 2002) joined Disney in 1934. His work includes Jiminy Cricket (in Pinocchio), Lucifer, Jaq and Gus (in Cinderella), and the Mad Hatter and Cheshire Cat (in Alice in Wonderland). His work was often more 'wild' than the other Disney animators and was unique. In 1968 he created and released a non-Disney anti-Vietnam War animated short, Escalation.

Eric Larson (September 3, 1905 – October 25, 1988) joined in 1933. One of the top animators at Disney, he animated notable characters such as Peg in Lady and the Tramp; the Vultures in The Jungle Book; Peter Pan's flight over London to Neverland (in Peter Pan); and Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox, and Brer Bear (in Song of the South). Because of Larson's demeanor and ability to train new talent, Larson was given the task to spot and train new animators at Disney in the 1970s. Many of the top talents at Disney today were trained by Eric in the '70s and '80s.

John Lounsbery (March 9, 1911 – February 13, 1976) started in 1935 and, working under Norm 'Fergy' Ferguson, quickly became a star animator. Lounsbery, affectionately known as 'Louns' by his fellow animators, was an incredibly strong draftsman who inspired many animators over the years. His animation was noted for its squashy, stretchy feel. Lounsbery animated J. Worthington Foulfellow and Gideon in Pinocchio; Ben Ali Gator in Fantasia; George Darling in Peter Pan; Tony, Joe, and some of the dogs in Lady and the Tramp; Kings Stefan and Hubert in Sleeping Beauty; The Elephants in The Jungle Book; and many others. In the 1970s, Louns was promoted to Director and co-directed Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too and his last film, The Rescuers.

Wolfgang Reitherman (June 26, 1909 – May 22, 1985) joined Disney in 1935 as an animator and director. He produced all the animated Disney films after Walt's death until his retirement; In the 1950s, Reitherman was promoted as a director. He also directed a sequence in Sleeping Beauty which featured Prince Phillip's escape from Maleficent's castle and his eventual battle against her as a terrible fire-breathing dragon. Some of his work includes Monstro (in Pinocchio), The Headless Horseman (in The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad), the Crocodile (in Peter Pan), and the Rat (in Lady and the Tramp).

Frank Thomas (September 5, 1912 – September 8, 2004) joined Disney in 1934. He went on to author the animator's bible The Illusion of Life with Ollie Johnston. His work included the wicked Stepmother (in Cinderella), the Queen of Hearts (in Alice in Wonderland), and Captain Hook (in Peter Pan).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disney%27s_Nine_Old_Men
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